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The clicker became a popular tool for dog training in the 1980s. Today, it has also caught on with humans — helping people to become better dancers, fishermen, golfers, and now, surgeons. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

When Everything Clicks: The Power Of Judgment-Free Learning

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Two bonobos play fight at the Lola Ya Bonobo sanctuary in Democratic Republic of Congo in 2012. Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Unlike Humans, Bonobos Shun Helpers And Befriend The Bullies

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Turns out that humans aren't the only animals that contagiously yawn. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Yawning May Promote Social Bonding Even Between Dogs And Humans

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An American black bear (they are often brown) is seen in Yosemite National Park. Rangers hope tracking the bears' locations will help prevent the animals from being hit by cars. Yosemite National Park via AP hide caption

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Yosemite National Park via AP

Yosemite Rangers Use Technology To Save Bears From Cars

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Young European eels (Anguilla anguilla) are called "glass eels" at that stage because they're transparent except for a dark spine down the middle. Philippe Garguil/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Garguil/Science Source

Eels May Use 'Magnetic Maps' As They Slither Across The Ocean

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This wounded ant (Megaponera analis), with two termites clinging to it, is alive but likely too exhausted after battle to get back to the nest without help. Frank et al./Science Advances hide caption

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Frank et al./Science Advances

No Ant Left Behind: Warrior Ants Carry Injured Comrades Home

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Bumblebees have 100,000 times fewer neurons than humans do, but they can learn new skills quickly when there's a sweet reward at the end. Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Durham/Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Could A Bumblebee Learn To Play Fetch? Probably

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Musi, an African elephant, is one of Fresno Chaffee Zoo's five elephants enrolled in the Elephant Welfare Initiative. Courtesy of the Fresno Chaffee Zoo hide caption

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Courtesy of the Fresno Chaffee Zoo

Fitness Trackers Aim To Improve The Health And Happiness Of Zoo Elephants

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New research confirms that wild chimpanzee mothers play a key role in the "home schooling" of their offspring, including lessons on the use of specialized tools to fish for a meal in the termite hills of Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park. Courtesy of Michael Nichols hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Nichols

For 15 years, biologists in single-person, ultralight aircraft would each lead an experimental flock of young whooping cranes from Wisconsin to a winter home in Florida. But not anymore. Dave Umberger/AP hide caption

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Dave Umberger/AP

To Make A Wild Comeback, Cranes Need More Than Flying Lessons

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The dark red color and looming posture of this Octopus tetricus likely signals menace to another octopus nearby, say scientists who studied 186 octopus interactions in 52 hours of underwater video. David Scheel/Current Biology hide caption

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David Scheel/Current Biology

Shifting Colors Of An Octopus May Hint At A Rich, Nasty Social Life

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