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concussion

Quidditch is a fast-paced, co-ed, full-contact combination of dodgeball, rugby and basketball. Above, John Sheridan tries to score points by throwing a quaffle ball through the other team's hoop. Noah Fortson/NPR hide caption

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Noah Fortson/NPR

While a day or two of complete rest may be necessary for kids after a concussion, any more could leave them feeling isolated and anxious, says Angela Lumba-Brown, a pediatric emergency medicine physician who helped shape new guidelines. Gregoire Sitter/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregoire Sitter/EyeEm/Getty Images

Kids With Concussions Can Phase In Exercise, Screen Time Sooner Than Before

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UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA

Concussions from domestic violence are sometimes overlooked in patient care. MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images

Domestic Violence's Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury

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Marines based in Okinawa, Japan, fire an M136 AT-4 rocket launcher as part of a weapons training exercise on the Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility, in 2014. Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS hide caption

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Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg/U.S. Marines/DVIDS

Army 'Leans In' To Protect A Shooter's Brain From Blast Injury

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U.S. Marines fire the Carl Gustav rocket system during live-fire training last October. With each firing, the shooter's brain is exposed to pulses of high pressure air emanating from the explosion that travel faster than the speed of sound. Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS hide caption

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Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS

Report To Army Finds Blast From Some Weapons May Put Shooter's Brain At Risk

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Aaron Hernandez (81), of the New England Patriots, lost his helmet during this play against the New York Jets in 2011. Hernandez killed himself in 2017, and researchers found that he had had one of the most severe cases of CTE ever seen in someone his age. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

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Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

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Professional fighter Gina Mazany practices during a training session at Xtreme Couture Mixed Martial Arts in Las Vegas. She well remembers her first concussion — which came in her first fight. "I was throwing up that night," Mazany says. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

Female Athletes Are Closing The Gender Gap When It Comes To Concussions

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A saliva test allowed scientists to accurately predict how long concussion symptoms would last in children. technotr/Getty Images hide caption

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technotr/Getty Images

Spit Test May Reveal The Severity Of A Child's Concussion

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Coalition forces fire a Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle during a training exercise in Afghanistan's Helmand province in 2013. Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS hide caption

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Spc. Justin Young/U.S. Department of Defense/DVIDS

Do U.S. Troops Risk Brain Injury When They Fire Heavy Weapons?

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Charles Mayer, 30, of San Diego survived an IED attack while serving in Iraq in 2010, but has suffered from complications including PTSD. Stuart Palley for NPR hide caption

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Stuart Palley for NPR

War Studies Suggest A Concussion Leaves The Brain Vulnerable To PTSD

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