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precision medicine

Dr. Vinay Prasad is 35 and an assistant professor of medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, where he researches health policy, the high cost of drugs and evidence-based medicine. He has more than 21,000 followers on Twitter. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Tweeting Oncologist Draws Ire And Admiration For Calling Out Hype

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"I'm one of the lucky ones," says Judy Perkins, of the immunotherapy treatment she got. The experimental approach seems to have eradicated her metastatic breast cancer." Courtesy of Judy Perkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Judy Perkins

Therapy Made From Patient's Immune System Shows Promise For Advanced Breast Cancer

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Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Careful custody of blood tests and tissue samples is essential to the success of precision medicine. David Silverman/Getty Images hide caption

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David Silverman/Getty Images

Precision Medical Treatments Have A Quality Control Problem

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Volunteer Greg Ruegsegger is outfitted with monitors, a catheter threaded into a vein and a mask to capture his breath in an experiment run by Joyner to measure human performance. Richard Harris/NPR hide caption

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Richard Harris/NPR

Will Gathering Vast Troves of Information Really Lead To Better Health?

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Kolbi Brown (left), a program manager at Harlem Hospital in New York, helps Karen Phillips sign up to receive more information about the All of Us medical research program, during a block party outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Troubling History In Medical Research Still Fresh For Black Americans

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Electronic Health Records May Help Customize Medical Treatments

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Harvard University student Elana Simon introduces President Obama before he spoke at the White House Friday about an initiative to encourage research into more precise medicine. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images