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measles outbreak

The Washington state Senate passed a bill on Wednesday that would remove the personal belief exemption from the required vaccinations for measles, mumps and rubella. Here, people protest the related house bill outside Washington's Legislative Building in Olympia in February. Lindsey Wasson/Reuters hide caption

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Lindsey Wasson/Reuters

More than 285 cases of the measles have been reported in New York since October. Nearly all are associated with people who live in the Williamsburg or Borough Park neighborhoods of Brooklyn. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Measles is a highly contagious illness that can cause serious health problems, including brain damage, deafness and, in rare cases, death. Vaccination can prevent measles infections. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Defying Parents, A Teen Decides To Get Vaccinated

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Amber Gorrow and her daughter, Eleanor, 3, pick out a show to watch after Eleanor's nap at their home in Vancouver, Wash., on Wednesday. Eleanor has gotten her first measles vaccine, but Gorrow's son, Leon, 8 weeks, is still too young to be immunized. Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images

Measles Cases Mount In Pacific Northwest Outbreak

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A measles outbreak in Washington state has triggered a state of emergency. In Clark County, where 35 cases have been reported, 31 were not immunized. Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Khadra Abdulle, a resident of St. Paul, stops to shop at the Riverside Market in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis. It's the inaccurate information about a link between vaccines and autism, she says, that's keeping some well-meaning parents from getting their kids vaccinated against measles. Mark Zdechlik/MPR hide caption

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Mark Zdechlik/MPR

Unfounded Autism Fears Are Fueling Minnesota's Measles Outbreak

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Most of the people who got measles in last year's outbreaks hadn't been vaccinated with the MMR vaccine. Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A photo from April shows protesters in Sacramento, Calif., rallying against a bill that would require all school-age children to be vaccinated. The state Senate just passed the measure. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Sara Martín reads bedtime stories with her children. When the kids were younger, she says, staying up to date on their frequent immunizations was tough, because of cost and transportation issues. Lauren M. Whaley/CHCF Center for Health Reporting hide caption

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Lauren M. Whaley/CHCF Center for Health Reporting

Schools Not Keeping Track When Kids Are Behind On Their Shots

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Jackie Carnegie immunizes Mabel Haywood in a Colorado Health Department immunization van in 1972. Shots for measles and other infectious diseases were offered. Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Ira Gay Sealy/Denver Post Archive/Getty Images