ocean ocean
Stories About

ocean

Scientists tagged over 30 great white sharks last fall — more than they had ever done in a single season. Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Stanford University — Block Lab Hopkins Marine Station

Great White Sharks Have A Secret 'Cafe,' And They Led Scientists Right To It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/613394086/614935614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Oysters, shown out of their shell, collect tiny plastic particles while in the water. These microplastics can eventually make their way into your dinner. Ken Christensen/KCTS Television hide caption

toggle caption
Ken Christensen/KCTS Television

Marine ecologist Neil Hammerschlag says he can sometimes identify sharks like Emma (pictured) by the way they move. "It's pretty cool to be able to jump in the water and say, 'Hey look, there's Emma the tiger shark!' " Neil Hammerschlag hide caption

toggle caption
Neil Hammerschlag

A Marine Ecologist On Swimming With Sharks And What 'Jaws' Got Wrong

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486012072/486066875" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

toggle caption
Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society

Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479468130/479647103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A fisherman collects water on a beach littered with trash at an ecological reserve south of Manila in 2013. Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Francis R. Malasig/EPA/Landov

8 Million Tons Of Plastic Clutter Our Seas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/385752248/385794002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript