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Wild bison destined for Banff National Park are prepared for loading and travel at Elk Island National Park's bison-handling facility in Alberta, Canada, on Jan. 31. Johane Janelle/Parks Canada /Reuters hide caption

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Johane Janelle/Parks Canada /Reuters

A lighthouse built in 1858 stands on Loggerhead Key, Fla., an uninhabited tropical island. Artists Paula Sprenger and Carter McCormick participated in a monthlong artist residency here. Courtesy of Paula Sprenger and Carter McCormick hide caption

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Courtesy of Paula Sprenger and Carter McCormick

Making Art Off The Grid: A Monthlong Residency At A Remote National Park

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A photo provided by The Trust for Public Land shows Ackerson Meadow in Yosemite National Park, Calif. Visitors to the park now have more room to explore nature with Wednesday's announcement that the park's western boundary has expanded to include Ackerson Meadow, 400 acres of tree-covered Sierra Nevada foothills, grassland and a creek that flows into the Tuolumne River. Robb Hirsch/AP hide caption

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Robb Hirsch/AP

Gracie, Glacier National Park's first Bark Ranger, shepherds wildlife away from popular tourist spots and teaches park visitors how to safely view wildlife. Nicky Ouellet/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nicky Ouellet/Montana Public Radio

'Bark Ranger' Helps Lick Dangerous Wildlife Encounters In National Park

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The Chickasaw National Recreation Area used to be called Platt National Park until 1976, when it lost its status as a national park. NPS Cultural Landscapes/Flickr hide caption

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NPS Cultural Landscapes/Flickr

In Oklahoma, A National Park That Got Demoted

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Joshua Tree National Park is known for its iconic trees, but Joshua tree habitat is expected to shrink dramatically because of climate change. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Planning For The Future Of A Park Where The Trees Have One Name

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Michael Peterson, an archaeologist at Redwood National Park in California, photographs the coastline annually to monitor erosion of archaeological sites. Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/OPB/EarthFix

As Storms Erode California's Cliffs, Buried Village Could Get Washed Away

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Moraine Park is a grassy valley inside Rocky Mountain National Park. Wes Lindamood/NPR hide caption

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Wes Lindamood/NPR

Beyond Sightseeing: You'll Love The Sound Of America's Best Parks

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Tamara Johnson is a new Outdoor Afro leader in Atlanta. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Code Switch Podcast, Episode 2: Being 'Outdoorsy' When You're Black Or Brown

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Stands of dead hemlock trees can be seen at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee. Mike Belleme for NPR hide caption

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Mike Belleme for NPR

To Tame A 'Wave' Of Invasive Bugs, Park Service Introduces Predator Beetles

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A black bear looks up at a line of picture-taking tourists near the popular Laurel Falls Trail in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which is on the border of North Carolina and Tennessee. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Keeping Bears Wild — Or Trying — At National Parks

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A couple walk along the Cactus Forest Trail in Saguaro National Park in Tucson, Ariz., last May. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Don't Care About National Parks? The Park Service Needs You To

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Tourists at Grand Canyon National Park in northern Arizona wait for a shuttle bus in 2015. For years, the Grand Canyon and other big national parks have been seeing rising attendance. Felicia Fonseca/AP hide caption

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Felicia Fonseca/AP

Long Lines, Packed Campsites And Busy Trails: Our Crowded National Parks

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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again

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The Gateway Arch in St. Louis remains the tallest man-made monument in the United States. A new museum under construction on the Arch's grounds will reopen in 2017. Bill Greenblatt/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Bill Greenblatt/UPI/Landov

As Gateway Arch Turns 50, Its Message Gets Reframed

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A weekly pass at Rocky Mountain National Park increases Thursday from $20 to $30, which will go toward paying for park improvements such as picnic tables, restrooms and trail maintenance. Steve Mulder/Flickr hide caption

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Steve Mulder/Flickr

Get Ready To Pay More To Enter Some National Parks

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