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Journalists interview oil ministers on the sidelines of the 176th meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries conference on Monday in Vienna. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

Much of the nearly 180,000 gallons of crude oil spilled went into the Ash Coulee Creek, just 150 miles from the Dakota Access pipeline protest camp. Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health hide caption

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Jennifer Skjod/North Dakota Department of Health

Pipeline Spill Adds To Concerns About Dakota Access Pipeline

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Native Americans march to a sacred site on Sunday that they say was disturbed by bulldozers working on the Dakota Access Pipeline, near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux tribe's protest. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Native Americans march on Sunday to a sacred site they say was disturbed by bulldozers working on the Dakota Access Pipeline, near an encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest. Robyn Beck /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck /AFP/Getty Images

The freighter American Mariner discharges its load of iron ore in Cleveland last November. Prices for iron ore and other commodities have plunged amid economic uncertainty in China and Europe. Mark Duncan/AP hide caption

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Mark Duncan/AP

Cushing, Okla., is a major oil storage site. Amid record oil production, some analysts worry the U.S. will run out of places to put it all. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

With So Much Oil Flowing, U.S. May Be Reaching Storage Limits

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Quinault Indian Nation President Fawn Sharp stands on the docks as tribal crabbers unload their catch. The tribe has vowed to fight the oil train-to-ship terminals proposed for Grays Harbor. Ashley Ahearn/KUOW hide caption

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Ashley Ahearn/KUOW

Washington State County Unsure If It Can Take Wave Of North Dakota Crude

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