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President Trump hands out pens after signing an executive order aimed at making it easier for companies to pursue oil and gas pipeline projects. The president addressed an audience at the International Union of Operating Engineers International Training and Education Center in Texas. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Downed trees mark the route of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline in Deerfield, Va., in February. A federal appeals court has blocked development of portions of the pipeline. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Workers pull pipes from an oil well in 2016 near Crescent, Okla. The oil industry wants to attract a new, more diverse generation of workers, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem

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Leanne Abraham/NPR

Natural Gas Building Boom Fuels Climate Worries, Enrages Landowners

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Demonstrators march in Washington, D.C., on Friday, calling on the Trump administration to meet with tribal leaders and opposing construction of the nearly complete Dakota Access Pipeline. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Crews clean up the diesel fuel spill after a pipeline broke in Worth County, Iowa on Wednesday. Chris Zoeller/Mason City Globe Gazette/globegazette.com hide caption

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Chris Zoeller/Mason City Globe Gazette/globegazette.com

Demonstrators chant and hold up signs as they gather in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline in September. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip shakes the hands of First Nation leaders after they sign the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion during an announcement on oil sands pipelines Thursday at the Musqueam Community Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia. Ben Nelms/Reuters hide caption

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Ben Nelms/Reuters

Companies Fight Back Against Protesters With Financial Pressure

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Miller Farm, the terminus of Van Syckel's pipeline, in 1868. The oil was pumped to Miller Farm and then transported by railroad. Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC hide caption

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Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC

Even Pickaxes Couldn't Stop The Nation's First Oil Pipeline

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