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We asked insiders to weigh in on the trends that will shape the internet in 2024 Grace Cary/Getty Images hide caption

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Grace Cary/Getty Images

Less oversharing and more intimate AI relationships? Internet predictions for 2024

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JEFF HAYNES/AFP via Getty Images

A market to bet on the future

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Jonathan Graziano with his pug, Noodle. The two have taken to forecasting the mood of the day based on whether Noodle stands up or flops down in bed. @jongraz/TikTok hide caption

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@jongraz/TikTok

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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Dan Gilbert says we're not great at predicting how much we will enjoy an experience in part because we fail to consider all of the details. We think a visit to the dentist will be terrible, but we're forgetting about the free toothbrush, the nice chat with the dental hygienist and the magazines in the waiting room. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Why are some warnings heard, while others are ignored? Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

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Sara Wong for NPR

Invisibilia: Do the Patterns in Your Past Predict Your Future?

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From sports, to politics, to the stock market, we love to make (and hear) predictions. This week, Hidden Brain explores why the so-called experts are so often wrong, and how we can avoid the common pitfalls of telling the future. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Degrees of Maybe: How We Can All Make Better Predictions

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