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cesarean section

Dr. Ruth Levesque (right) hands Shaun McDougall his newborn son Brady at South Shore Hospital in Weymouth, Mass. The birth of the second twin, Bryce, was much trickier than Brady's. Good communication between the health team and parents was crucial to safely avoiding a C-section, obstetricians say. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Twin's Difficult Birth Put A Project Designed To Reduce C-Sections To The Test

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Nicole and Ben Veum, with their little boy, Adrian. Nicole was in recovery from opioid addiction when she gave birth to Adrian, and she worried the fentanyl in her epidural would lead to relapse, but it didn't. Adam Grossberg/KQED hide caption

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Adam Grossberg/KQED

Childbirth In The Age Of Addiction: New Mom Worries About Maintaining Her Sobriety

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Evelyn Marie Vukadinovich is swabbed with a gauze pad immediately after being born by cesarean section at Inova Women's Hospital in Falls Church, Va. Mary Mathis/NPR hide caption

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Mary Mathis/NPR

Doctors Test Bacterial Smear After Cesarean Sections To Bolster Babies' Microbiomes

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Delayed pushing made no difference in whether first-time mothers had a cesarean section, a large study finds. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

When Giving Birth For The First Time, Push Away

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Inducing labor at 39 weeks may involve IV medications and continuous fetal monitoring. But if the pregnancy is otherwise uncomplicated, mother and baby can do just fine, the latest evidence suggests. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

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California is starting to push hospitals throughout the state to lower their rates of medically unnecessary C-sections. Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images hide caption

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Thanasis Zovoilis/Getty Images

California's Message To Hospitals: Shape Up Or Lose 'In-Network' Status

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Women go through a lot in the delivery of a healthy baby. But in most cases, doctors say, an episiotomy needn't be part of the experience. Marc Romanelli/Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Romanelli/Blend Images/Getty Images

When a baby is born by cesarean section, she misses out on Mom's microbes in the birth canal. Sarah Small/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Small/Getty Images

Researchers Test Microbe Wipe To Promote Babies' Health After C-Sections

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Should More Women Give Birth Outside The Hospital?

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Kristen Caminiti cuddles her son Connor while doctors stitch her up following a C-section. Courtesy of Kristen DeBoy Caminiti hide caption

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Courtesy of Kristen DeBoy Caminiti

The Gentle Cesarean: More Like A Birth Than An Operation

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