policing policing

Officer Jesus Robles (at right) and Officer Jason Cisneroz, community service officers in the Houston Police Department, have noticed that fewer unauthorized Latinos step forward to report crimes out of fear of deportation. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

New Immigration Crackdowns Creating 'Chilling Effect' On Crime Reporting

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Protesters attend a rally in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 2016, in support of former NYPD Officer Peter Liang, who was convicted of manslaughter and official misconduct for the shooting death of Akai Gurley in a housing development stairwell. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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The New Orleans Police Department was one of the first big police departments in the U.S. to embrace the use of body cameras. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gardner/Getty Images

New Orleans' Police Use Of Body Cameras Brings Benefits And New Burdens

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Patrisse Khan-Cullors and two friends are founders of the Black Lives Matter movement. She sees the movement going forward with renewed focus, and building political power. Courtesy of Patrisse Khan-Cullors hide caption

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Courtesy of Patrisse Khan-Cullors

Black Lives Matter Finds 'Renewed Focus' 5 Years After Trayvon Martin

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In a live TV program, John Macharia tells the Kenyan president that traffic police in Nairobi expect bribes from matatu drivers. iNooroTV/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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iNooroTV/Screenshot by NPR

Kenyan Bus Driver Speaks Out Against Everyday Corruption On Live TV

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Attorney General Loretta Lynch (right), speaks during a joint news conference to announce the Baltimore Police Department's commitment to a sweeping overhaul of its practices under a court-enforceable agreement with the federal government on Thursday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

The broken windows theory of policing suggested that cleaning up the visible signs of disorder — like graffiti, loitering, panhandling and prostitution — would prevent more serious crime as well. Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Getty Images/Image Source

How A Theory Of Crime And Policing Was Born, And Went Terribly Wrong

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Abby McLean of Northglenn, Colo., stands near the stretch of U.S. 85 in Adams County where she was pulled over for a DUI check in September 2014. Nathaniel Minor/CPR News hide caption

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Nathaniel Minor/CPR News

The Difficulty Of Enforcing Laws Against Driving While High

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Last month, Marilyn Mosby, Baltimore's chief prosecutor, announced she was dropping the remaining charges against the three Baltimore police officers who were still awaiting trial in Freddie Gray's death in Baltimore. The Gray case set off a wave of protests and unrest in Baltimore. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

A car with "#Justice4Philando" written on it is parked outside the funeral of Philando Castile at the Cathedral of St. Paul. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

46 Stops: On 'The Driving Life And Death Of Philando Castile'

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Protesters camped out in front of the Minnesota Governor's Residence, calling for more "judgment" by police officers. Many say officers are too quick to shoot people whom they perceive as threats. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Are Police Being Taught To Pull The Trigger Too Fast?

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The protest movement that has sprung up around police violence and criminal justice reform first spread like wildfire online, which researchers say allowed activists to circumvent traditional new media to get their message out. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

According to the new ruling, police in five Southeastern states cannot use Tasers on nonviolent, noncooperative suspects. Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Officers Colin Lewis and Brad Smith (center) on patrol near a park in Huntington Beach, Calif. The area has seen a sharp increase in homelessness and petty thefts, which the officers blame on Proposition 47. But the law's supporters say other California cities have seen declines in property crime. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

California Cops Frustrated With 'Catch-And-Release' Crime-Fighting

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Attorney General Eric Holder (right) listens to Viola Murphy, mayor of Cool Valley, Mo., before his meeting with local community leaders in August 2014. Murphy is a vocal critic of new municipal regulations. Pablo Martinez-Monsivais /Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Martinez-Monsivais /Getty Images

After Ferguson, Unintended Consequences Of Municipal Overhaul

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