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Different parts of the brain aren't always in the same stage of sleep at the same time, notes neurologist and author Guy Leschziner. When this happens, an individual might order a pizza or go out for a drive — while technically still being fast asleep. Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic Cirou/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

From Insomnia To Sexsomnia, Unlocking The 'Secret World' Of Sleep

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An MRI scan of a person listening to music shows brain areas that respond. (This scan wasn't part of the research comparing humans and monkeys.) KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source hide caption

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KUL BHATIA/Kul Bhatia/Science Source

A Musical Brain May Help Us Understand Language And Appreciate Tchaikovsky

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A California two-spot octopus extends a sucker-lined arm from its den. In 2015, this was the first octopus species to have its full genetic sequence published. Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

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Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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Given supportive, nurturing conditions, highly reactive "orchid" children can thrive when tackling challenges, pediatrician and author Thomas Boyce says, especially if they have the comfort of a regular routine. Michael H/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael H/Getty Images

Is Your Child An Orchid Or A Dandelion? Unlocking The Science Of Sensitive Kids

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A Neuroscientist Explores The Biology Of Addiction In 'Never Enough'

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Person undergoing a CAT scan in hospital with PET scan equipment. Emerging studies report findings of brain deterioration in females to be slower than that of males'. Johnny Greig/Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Greig/Getty Images

Scans Show Female Brains Remain Youthful As Male Brains Wind Down

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Researchers say human brains can become overwhelmed by cute traits, such as large eyes and small noses, embodied by movie characters like Bambi. Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images hide caption

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Disney Junior/Disney Channel via Getty Images

When Too Cute Is Too Much, The Brain Can Get Aggressive

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Research inspired by soccer headers has led to fresh insights into how the brain weathers hits to the head. Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by David Madison/Getty Images

Bad Vibes: How Hits To The Head Are Transferred To The Brain

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In experiments involving people with epilepsy, targeted zaps of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex region of the brain helped ease depressive symptoms. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Scientists Improve Mood By Stimulating A Brain Area Above The Eyes

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Patients awaiting epilepsy surgery agreed to keep a running log of their mood while researchers used tiny wires to monitor electrical activity in their brains. The combination revealed a circuit for sadness. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Researchers Uncover A Circuit For Sadness In The Human Brain

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How does the brain's working memory actually work? Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Berkeley/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Neuroscientists Debate A Simple Question: How Does The Brain Store A Phone Number?

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The cerebellum, a brain structure humans share with fish and lizards, appears to control the quality of many functions in the brain, according to a team of researchers. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

The Underestimated Cerebellum Gains New Respect From Brain Scientists

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The fix was in for this rhesus macaque drinking juice on the Ganges River in Rishikesh, Uttarakhand, India. No gambling was required to get the reward. Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM hide caption

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Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area

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An image of a rosehip neuron (top) and a connecting pyramidal cell (bottom). Tamas Lab/University of Szeged hide caption

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Tamas Lab/University of Szeged

What Makes A Human Brain Unique? A Newly Discovered Neuron May Be A Clue

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Jazz legend Billie Holiday at a recording session in 1957. Holiday's pioneering vocal style played with tempo, phrasing and pitch to stir hearts. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Poliovirus, long a scourge, has been modified by Duke University researchers for experimental use as a brain cancer treatment. Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source

Several circular herpes virus particles are seen near a cell membrane. Roseola herpes virus causes a childhood illness marked by skin rashes and now has been found in brains with Alzheimer's disease. NCI/Science Source hide caption

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NCI/Science Source

Researchers Find Herpes Viruses In Brains Marked By Alzheimer's Disease

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