product safety product safety

An 11-year-old boy put small magnets up both nostrils, then couldn't figure out how to get them out. These X-rays tell the tale. The New England Journal of Medicine hide caption

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The New England Journal of Medicine

Product safety field staff send damaged products, such as this burnt battery pack from a defective electric scooter, to the government testing lab in Rockville, Md. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

As Batteries Keep Catching Fire, U.S. Safety Agency Prepares For Change

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Samsung is recalling nearly 3 million top-load washers — but not front-load machines — following reports of excessive vibration that could cause the lids to blow off. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 was a unique, critically acclaimed phone before the company had to recall every unit, including those issued as allegedly safer replacements, over risks of smoke, fire and explosions. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

A man walks past a Lumber Liquidators store in Philadelphia. The retailer says it stands by its products and will pay for the safety testing of laminate floors. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Lumber Liquidators Defends Its Products After '60 Minutes' Report

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