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Ben Crump speaks at a news conference in April in New York City. On Monday, the civil rights attorney called on the Justice Department to launch an investigation into inmate deaths at the Harris County Jail in Houston. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Matt Butler performing at the Central Utah Correctional Facility. Liam Trouchard/Matt Butler hide caption

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Liam Trouchard/Matt Butler

Matt Butler has played concerts in more than 50 prisons and jails

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A picture of a cell at the state prison in Florence, Ariz., where attorneys for the Prison Law Office and ACLU found what they called "squalid" and "filthy" conditions on a recent tour. PACER hide caption

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PACER

Corrections health experts have been urging prison administrators to plan for coronavirus. Just One Film/Getty Images hide caption

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Just One Film/Getty Images

Prisons And Jails Worry About Becoming Coronavirus 'Incubators'

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Kristine Autenreith teaches language arts to juveniles at the Allegheny County Jail. The students are in the jail because they're being tried as adults for crimes such as murder, rape and robbery. An-Li Herring/WESA hide caption

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An-Li Herring/WESA

In Pittsburgh, Juvenile Offenders At The Local Jail Go Back To School, Too

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In Massachusetts last July, several Franklin County Jail inmates were watched by a nurse and a corrections officer after receiving their daily doses of buprenorphine, a drug that helps control opioid cravings. By some estimates, at least half to two-thirds of today's U.S. jail population has a substance use or dependence problem. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

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The Massachusetts Alcohol and Substance Abuse Center in Plymouth houses men for court-mandated addiction treatment. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

Prison For Forced Addiction Treatment? A Parent's 'Last Resort' Has Consequences

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Lt. Ryan Snyder, who works at the Champaign County jail in Illinois, says it's hard for any such facility to provide the kind of one-on-one mental health treatment many inmates need. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media
Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Behind Bars, Mentally Ill Inmates Are Often Punished For Their Symptoms

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An average of 13,776 inmates in 45 California counties were on psychotropic medications in 2016-2017, a recent report found. That is up from 10,999 five years ago. erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images hide caption

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erwin rachbauer/imageBROKER RM/Getty Images

By some estimates, nearly half of the people confined in U.S. jails and prisons have a mental illness, notes Alisa Roth, author of Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness. Darrin Klimek/Getty Images hide caption

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Darrin Klimek/Getty Images

'Insane': America's 3 Largest Psychiatric Facilities Are Jails

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Madison Jensen, 21, died on Dec. 1, 2016, of a cardiac arrhythmia due to dehydration and opiate withdrawal while in custody of the Duchesne County, Utah, jail. Courtesy of Jared Jensen hide caption

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Courtesy of Jared Jensen

People walk by a sign at the entrance to Rikers Island on March 31, 2017. New York cITY Mayor Bill de Blasio has said that he agrees with the fundamentals of a plan to close the jail complex within 10 years. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Kara Salim, 26, got out of the Marion County, Indiana, jail in 2015 with a history of domestic-violence charges, bipolar disorder and alcoholism — and without Medicaid coverage. As a result, she couldn't afford the fees for court-ordered therapy. Philip Scott Andrews for KHN hide caption

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Philip Scott Andrews for KHN

Signed Out Of Prison But Not Signed Up For Health Insurance

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Dawn Herbert visits with her son Tommy Rogers via video call at Cheshire County Jail in Keene, N.H. Natasha Haverty for NPR hide caption

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Natasha Haverty for NPR

Video Calls Replace In-Person Visits In Some Jails

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Is America Engaged In A 'Vicious Circle' Of Jailing The Poor?

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A cell at New York's Rikers Island jail. About 1,000 people die in American jails every year, and about a third of those are suicides. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

The 'Shock Of Confinement': The Grim Reality Of Suicide In Jail

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Remote Jailing Cuts Off Inmates From Real-World Support System

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