health privacy health privacy

It's one thing to track your heart rate, pulse or other movements with a smart watch or other consumer electronics, researchers say, but quite another to rely on the device to diagnose a disease. martin-dm/Getty Images hide caption

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martin-dm/Getty Images

Like It Or Not, Personal Health Technology Is Getting Smarter

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Ronda Goldfein, attorney and executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, holds an envelope that revealed a person's HIV status through the clear window. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Aetna Agrees To Pay $17 Million In HIV Privacy Breach

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Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

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Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College

VA addiction therapist Brandon Coleman, now on administrative leave, testified about widespread problems with privacy breaches before the Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs in September. Madison Kirkman/AP Images for ProPublica hide caption

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Madison Kirkman/AP Images for ProPublica
Bryan Anselm for ProPublica

Repeat Violators Of Health Privacy Laws Often Go Unpunished

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The Medical Board of California accused Peter Brabeck's doctor in 2011 of overprescribing him controlled substances. Afterward, Brabeck, who lives near Carmel, Calif., learned the doctor had hired a private investigator and gave him Brabeck's medical records. Ramin Rahimian for ProPublica hide caption

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Ramin Rahimian for ProPublica

ProPublica's Charles Ornstein talks about data breaches

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A researcher found that online medical searches may be seen by hidden parties, and the data sold for profit. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Online Health Searches Aren't Always Confidential

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