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cannabidiol

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a compound that can be extracted from marijuana or from hemp. It doesn't get people high because it doesn't contain THC, the psychoactive component of the cannabis plant. Getty Images hide caption

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Evelyn Nussembaum and her son Sam Vogelstein pick up a six month supply of Epidiolex from the experimental pharmacy at UCSF. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

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A sample of cannabidiol (CBD) oil is dropped into water. Supplements containing the marijuana extract are popular and widely sold as remedies for a variety of ailments and aches. But scientific evidence that they work hasn't yet caught up for most applications, researchers say. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

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The drug sold as K2, spike, spice or "synthetic marijuana" may look like dried marijuana leaves. But it's really any of a combination of chemicals created in a lab that are then sprayed on dried plant material. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Surge In Use Of 'Synthetic Marijuana' Still One Step Ahead Of The Law

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Current

When Weed Is The Cure: A Doctor's Case for Medical Marijuana

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Marijuana at a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles. Twenty-three states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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