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Filipino Catholic priests (seated from left) Albert Alejo, Robert Reyes and Flavie Villanueva are prayed over by nuns and religious leaders after talking to reporters in Quezon City, north of Manila, Philippines, on March 11. The three priests say they and other clergy who have criticized the president's crackdown on drugs, have received death threats from unknown people. Aaron Favila/AP hide caption

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Aaron Favila/AP

Philippine Clergy Reports Death Threats As President Duterte Rails Against Church

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A farmer shows cocaine base paste, made from coca leaves in Colombia's Guaviare department in 2017. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

Colombia Is Growing Record Amounts Of Coca, The Key Ingredient In Cocaine

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte delivers a statement in Manila in Nov. 2017. Duterte will withdraw the Philippines from the Rome Statute, the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC), according to a statement released to reporters in Manila on Wednesday. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

Line workers sort freshly cut avocados at Frutas Finas packing plant in Tancitaro. Forty-five percent of the world's avocados come from Mexico. Eighty percent of avocados consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, the majority from the small mountain town of Tancitaro. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Blood Avocados No More: Mexican Farm Town Says It's Kicked Out Cartels

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Activists protest at the headquarters of the Philippine National Police, condemning the government's war on drugs and holding placards showing murdered South Korean businessman Jee Ick-joo. The South Korean businessman was allegedly kidnapped by Philippine policemen under the guise of a raid on illegal drugs and murdered at the national police headquarters in Manila, authorities said. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

A Foreign Businessman's Murder Pauses Philippine Drug War, But For How Long?

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