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Palestinian children wait to collect food at a donation point in a refugee camp in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on December 23, 2023. Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images

Humanitarian crises abound. Why is the U.N. asking for less aid money than last year?

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Displaced Palestinians receive food aid at the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees center in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on Sunday. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Workers load the trucks with boxes after a planes carrying Turkish humanitarian aid for residents of the Gaza Strip landed at El Arish International Airport in Egypt, neighboring the enclave under intense Israeli blockade and bombardment on October 13, 2023. Stringer/Anadolu via Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/Anadolu via Getty Images

About 2 million people in Burkina Faso have been displaced during the current conflict, including these individuals in Gampela, who fled jihadists' attacks. Issouf Sanogo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Issouf Sanogo/AFP via Getty Images

The city center of Jableh is home to older buildings as well as newer, less regulated construction. An image of President Bashar Assad hangs over a street cart with the slogan "We continue with you" in Arabic. Aya Batrawy/NPR hide caption

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Aya Batrawy/NPR

Iraqis displaced from the city of Fallujah collect aid distributed by the Norwegian Refugee Council, which has been awarded this year's $2.5 million Conrad N. Hilton Humanitarian Prize. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images

Sir Mark Lowcock, the former head of the U.N.'s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, has written a memoir, Relief Chief: A Manifesto for Saving Lives in Dire Times. In 2017, he was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath for his work in international development. Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thierry Roge/AFP via Getty Images

Bilquis Edhi watched over abandoned children in cradles at the Edhi orphanage in Karachi in 2010. Over the years, thousands of children have been left in the network of cradles outside Edhi centers she set up across Pakistan. Behrouz Mehri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Behrouz Mehri/AFP via Getty Images

Vladimir Benc carries packages of donations at a warehouse in Presov, Slovakia. Dozens of volunteers collect and sort the aid, which includes canned food, toiletries, diapers, baby formula and sleeping bags. Benc leads a convoy at least once a week to cities like Uzhhorod and Mukachevo in Ukraine, which are near the Slovak border. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

A Slovak man wanted to take donations to Ukraine. He ended up leading convoys of aid

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Refugees fleeing Ukraine receive food from the International Red Cross and other organizations at the Vysne Nemecke border crossing in Slovakia on Sunday. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

How to help refugees when you've become one yourself

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In this photo taken on Jan. 20, a beach resort in Tonga, on the outskirts of the capital of Nuku'alofa, shows the impact of the tsunami that hit the island nation in the wake of an underwater volcanic eruption. Aid efforts have been complicated by the pandemic — with only one case of COVID on record, Tonga is wary of outsiders who might bring the virus. Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Why Tonga is opting for 'contactless' humanitarian aid

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Roqia Qasqari, 47, who lives in Gero village in Afghanistan's Bamyan Province, has a stockpile of potatoes from an earlier harvest. In 2021, her province and others experienced severe drought, jeopardizing the food supply. Hunger will continue to be an issue in Afghanistan and around the globe in 2022, especially for communities dealing with overlapping crises. Stefani Glinski/The New Humanitarian hide caption

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Stefani Glinski/The New Humanitarian

Girls gather at a gender-segregated school in Kabul on Sept. 15. When older secondary students returned to classes, female students were told to wait. Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images

Aid Official Warns Of A Bleak Situation In Afghanistan As Winter Approaches

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Joel Charny, who's been a humanitarian aid worker for 40 years, talks to students at a camp for internally displaced people in northern Sri Lanka in 2005. It's one of his favorite photos, he says, "because this is what I did hundreds of times: interview people about what they were going through and what they needed for their lives to improve." Courtesy of Joel Charny hide caption

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Courtesy of Joel Charny

Marla Ruzicka, in her iconic sheepskin vest, stands in front of bullet-ridden cars in Kabul (March 2002). Kate Brooks/CIVIC hide caption

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Kate Brooks/CIVIC

Home/Front: Marla's List

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In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un speaks during a Politburo meeting of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea, on Tuesday. AP hide caption

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AP

Flooding And Pandemic Restrictions Compound North Korea's Food Insecurity

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