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In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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Ben and Tara Stern relax at home in Essex, Md. Ben was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2016. After conventional treatment failed to stop the tumor, Ben tried an experimental drug. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than Proof

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Glioblastomas are the most common malignant brain tumor. About 12,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with the cancer every year. Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging Lab/Science Source hide caption

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Sherbrooke Connectivity Imaging Lab/Science Source

John McCain Was Diagnosed With A Glioblastoma, Among The Deadliest Of Cancers

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A new study suggests that some small tumors are small because they are biologically prone to slow growth. Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Lester Lefkowitz/Getty Images

Some Small Tumors In Breasts May Not Be So Bad After All

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An 18th-century etching by artist John Kay depicts the extra tall Charles Byrne, the extra short George Cranstoun and three contemporaries of more conventional height. Byrne made his living as a professional spectacle and died at age 22 in 1783. Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images hide caption

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Wellcome Library, London/Wellcome Images

The Saga Of The Irish Giant's Bones Dismays Medical Ethicists

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Results from different genetic tests on samples from the same cancer patient can disagree about the best course of treatment. Clare McLean/University of Washington School of Medicine hide caption

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Clare McLean/University of Washington School of Medicine

Blaze Bioscience is commercially developing the "paint," which glows when exposed to near-infrared light. Courtesy of Blaze Bioscience hide caption

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Courtesy of Blaze Bioscience

Doctors Test Tumor Paint In People

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