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The American Military cemetery in Margraten, Netherlands, where David McGhee's grandfather, Sgt. Willie F. Williams, is buried. Marcel Van Hoorn/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marcel Van Hoorn/AFP/Getty Images

Mysterious Suitcase Helps Connecticut Man Discover His Grandfather's WWII Service

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An undated photo shows a Ku Klux Klansman and Neo-Nazi demonstrator holding symbolic shields at a march in Palm Beach, Fla. In Bring the War Home, author Kathleen Belew argues that America's disparate racists groups came together after the Vietnam War. Steven D Starr/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Steven D Starr/Corbis via Getty Images

How America's White Power Movement Coalesced After The Vietnam War

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"What the American Founding Fathers understood was that institutions were built for human imperfection, not human perfection," Condoleezza Rice says. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Condoleezza Rice Reflects On The State Of Democracy

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An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, sweet potato consumption in the United States nearly doubled in just 15 years. U.S. Department Of Agriculture hide caption

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U.S. Department Of Agriculture

World War II veteran Rudolpho Panaglima lives in Arlington, Va., with his wife, Pura, who holds a portrait of their four children living abroad. Their eldest son, Rolando, has been waiting 20 years for a visa to move to the U.S. from the Philippines. Evie Stone/NPR hide caption

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Evie Stone/NPR

Filipino World War II Veterans Living In U.S. Can Now Reunite With Family

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Demonstrators rally against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's controversial security bills in front of the National Diet in Tokyo in September. The bills, which passed, will allow Japan to send its troops overseas for the first time since World War II. However, the likelihood of Japanese involvement in a foreign war appears quite small. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

Japan Can Now Send Its Military Abroad, But Will It?

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Boston on Monday. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

The Past Haunts The Present For Japan's Shinzo Abe

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