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Judge Pauline Newman, a 96-year-old U.S. federal appeals court judge, has been barred from hearing cases for a year after a panel said she refused to undergo medical testing over concerns she's no longer mentally fit to serve on the bench. Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP file photo hide caption

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Haraz N. Ghanbari/AP file photo

Inmates condemned to die are spending more time on death row than years before. In this handout photo provided by California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, San Quentin's lethal injection facility is shown. California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation via Getty Images hide caption

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California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation via Getty Images

Ethan Kollie will stay in jail awaiting trial. He is charged helping the gunman obtain firearm accessories and body armor for the Dayton, Ohio, shooter. Montgomery County Sheriff via AP hide caption

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Montgomery County Sheriff via AP

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, a Republican, speaks to state legislators in 2018. Bevin, who is running for re-election this fall, asked the federal government to impose work requirements on many people who receive Medicaid. Bevin's predecessor, a Democrat, did not seek these requirements when he expanded the program under the Affordable Care Act. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Etchings on the federal courthouse in Boston acclaim a well-administered justice system, but many working in the building say that is getting harder, given the continuing federal shutdown. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

'Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied' As Government Shutdown Affects Federal Courts

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A flag flies outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. The Trump administration's reshaping of the federal judiciary continued at a steady pace, with 18 new appeals court judges confirmed in 2018. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Critics of President Trump's travel ban hold signs during a news conference with Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin on June 30 in Honolulu. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP

U.S. Challenges Hawaii Judge's Expansion of Relatives Exempt From Travel Ban

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Lawyers for the family of Nie Shubin, who was executed by firing squad in 1995 for rape and murder, leave court in December 2014. China's Supreme Court exonerated Nie on Dec. 2, following years of effort by his family to clear his name. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

China Exonerates Man Executed 21 Years Ago For A Murder He Didn't Commit

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The Sheikhan criminal court occupies a municipal office building north of Mosul. Cases are heard after long delays and defense attorneys have limited contact with their clients. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

At A Makeshift Iraqi Court, Harsh Justice For Those Accused Of Aiding ISIS

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According to the new ruling, police in five Southeastern states cannot use Tasers on nonviolent, noncooperative suspects. Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images

A new synagogue went up almost overnight as the older one was being taken down. They are only a block apart, but the new one is on land that is not part of this lawsuit. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

In The West Bank, A Synagogue Comes Down

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As colleges have been cracking down on campus sexual assault, some students have been complaining that schools are going too far and trampling the rights of the accused in the process. Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Getty Images

For Students Accused Of Campus Rape, Legal Victories Win Back Rights

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A Tea Party supporter rings a bell in protest of the health care law in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, as Obamacare supporters shout behind her. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Tyrone Peake says he's been fired from three jobs because a crime he committed more than 30 years ago is still on his record. Carrie Johnson/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Johnson/NPR

Can't Get A Job Because Of A Criminal Record? A Lawsuit Is Trying To Change That

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