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Critics of President Trump's travel ban hold signs during a news conference with Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin on June 30 in Honolulu. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP

U.S. Challenges Hawaii Judge's Expansion of Relatives Exempt From Travel Ban

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Lawyers for the family of Nie Shubin, who was executed by firing squad in 1995 for rape and murder, leave court in December 2014. China's Supreme Court exonerated Nie on Dec. 2, following years of effort by his family to clear his name. Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty Images

China Exonerates Man Executed 21 Years Ago For A Murder He Didn't Commit

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The Sheikhan criminal court occupies a municipal office building north of Mosul. Cases are heard after long delays and defense attorneys have limited contact with their clients. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

At A Makeshift Iraqi Court, Harsh Justice For Those Accused Of Aiding ISIS

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According to the new ruling, police in five Southeastern states cannot use Tasers on nonviolent, noncooperative suspects. Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Francis Wallace/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Prince George's County District Court in Maryland has used a mental health court as an alternative to traditional criminal proceedings. Sallicio/Wikimedia hide caption

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Sallicio/Wikimedia

A new synagogue went up almost overnight as the older one was being taken down. They are only a block apart, but the new one is on land that is not part of this lawsuit. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/NPR

In The West Bank, A Synagogue Comes Down

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As colleges have been cracking down on campus sexual assault, some students have been complaining that schools are going too far and trampling the rights of the accused in the process. Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Getty Images

For Students Accused Of Campus Rape, Legal Victories Win Back Rights

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As colleges have been cracking down on campus sexual assault, some students have been complaining that schools are going too far and trampling the rights of the accused in the process. Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Getty Images

For Students Accused Of Campus Rape, Legal Victories Win Back Rights

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A Tea Party supporter rings a bell in protest of the health care law in front of the U.S. Supreme Court, as Obamacare supporters shout behind her. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Tyrone Peake says he's been fired from three jobs because a crime he committed more than 30 years ago is still on his record. Carrie Johnson/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Johnson/NPR

Can't Get A Job Because Of A Criminal Record? A Lawsuit Is Trying To Change That

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