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Clockwise from top left: Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, Donald Trump, South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott, former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, Vivek Ramaswamy and former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. Anna Moneymaker, Brandon Bell, Win McNamee, Michael M. Santiago, Robyn Beck/AFP (2), Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker, Brandon Bell, Win McNamee, Michael M. Santiago, Robyn Beck/AFP (2), Ethan Miller/Getty Images

A Russian ruble coin is pictured in front of the Kremlin in central Moscow. ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP via Getty Images

The artificial strength of the Russian ruble

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Rep. Deb Haaland, D-N.M., during her Senate hearing Tuesday to be Interior Secretary. If confirmed, she would be the first Native American to hold the post. Jim Watson/AP hide caption

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Jim Watson/AP

A health worker dispenses sanitizer in Bungamati, Nepal, on April 15. ExxonMobil says it is reconfiguring a facility to make hand sanitizer. Alcohol companies switched to manufacturing and donating the in-demand product in mid-March. Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images

Producers have kept pumping oil, even if they're not making money, partly because wells — once shut down — can be difficult to get back up and running. Here, a pump jack operates at Willow Springs Park in Long Beach, Calif. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

The Environmental Protection Agency has released a proposed rule that could roll back requirements on detecting and plugging methane leaks at oil and gas facilities. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

A gas flare is seen at a natural gas processing facility near Williston, N.D. in 2015. A new study says the amount of methane leaking is more than government estimates. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Large Methane Leaks Threaten Perception Of 'Clean' Natural Gas

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Workers pull pipes from an oil well in 2016 near Crescent, Okla. The oil industry wants to attract a new, more diverse generation of workers, but a history of racism and sexism makes that difficult. J Pat Carter/Getty Images hide caption

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J Pat Carter/Getty Images

Big Oil Has A Diversity Problem

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Oil and gas operations near a subdivision in Firestone, Colo. RJ Sangosti/Denver Post/Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/Denver Post/Getty Images

Neighborhoods Worry About Living Amid Oil And Gas Development

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Ed Coker is a job steward with Pipeliners Local Union 798. He's a third generation welder and a second generation member of the Pipeliners union. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Environmentalists Provoke Pipeline Workers To Speak Up

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On May 4, workers dismantle the charred remains of a house in Firestone, Colo., where an unrefined gas line leak explosion killed two people in April. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

'They're Everywhere': Oil, Gas Wells Dot Developments, Raising Potential Dangers

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President Donald Trump signs a bill repealing a rule passed last July that required oil, gas and mining companies to disclose payments to overseas governments. The rule was meant to promote transparency. Critics of the repeal argue it served as an important national security tool since corruption often leads to violence, instability and terrorism. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Repeal Of Anti-Corruption Rule May Hurt National Security, Critics Warn

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Solenex's proposed well site is on the land known as the Badger-Two Medicine. Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Tribe Says Drilling Project Would Have 'Heartbreaking' Consequences

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Gary Matli, a field supervisor with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, inspects a disposal well located east of Guthrie, Okla. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

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Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Faced With Spate Of Tremors, Oklahoma Looks To Shake Up Its Oil Regulations

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An undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources of a northern long-eared bat. A fungal disease has devastated the species, now listed as threatened. AP hide caption

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AP

Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry

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