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This Nov. 18 photo shows a metal monolith in a remote area in Utah. The mysterious monolith has disappeared less than 10 days after it was spotted by wildlife biologists. Utah Department of Public Safety via AP hide caption

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Utah Department of Public Safety via AP

President Trump nominated William Perry Pendley in June to lead the Bureau of Land Management, but it has never been clear he had enough support to win confirmation in the Senate. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Bureau of Land Management Acting Director William Perry Pendley speaks at a conference for journalists in Fort Collins, Colo., last October. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Why A Vote For Trump's Lands Appointee May Put Some Western Republicans In A Bind

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Acting BLM Director William Perry Pendley stands in the mostly empty suite of offices at the agency's new planned headquarters in Grand Junction, Colo. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

BLM Acting Director Defends Agency's Controversial Move To Colorado

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The two bluffs that inspired the name of the Bears Ears National Monument, seen at sunset outside Blanding, Utah. On Thursday, more than two years after the Trump administration announced plans to shrink the monument and others, federal managers have finalized the new land use plans. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

At the Massacre Rim Dark Sky Sanctuary, the Milky Way galaxy shines bright enough at night to cast shadows. Richie Bednarski/Friends of Nevada Wilderness hide caption

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Richie Bednarski/Friends of Nevada Wilderness

This Remote Corner Of Nevada Is One Of The Darkest Places In The World

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Wyoming attorney Karen Budd-Falen, recently named as Deputy Solicitor for Parks and Wildlife at the Department of the Interior, sits in her law office in Cheyenne, Wyo. Mead Gruver/AP hide caption

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Mead Gruver/AP

Oil pump jacks work behind a natural gas flare near Watford City, N.D., in 2014. The oil and gas industry is lobbying lawmakers to repeal a rule that aims to limit the emissions of methane, the chief component of natural gas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Inside The Debate Over Repealing Curbs On Methane Leaks

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An Anasazi cliff dwelling, one of many ancient ruins in Recapture Canyon, Utah. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

In Utah, How You Tread Through This Canyon Matters

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Three of the national monuments now under review by the Department of the Interior: (from left to right) Gold Butte in Nevada, the Pacific Remote Islands and Giant Sequoia in Northern California. Bureau of Land Management/Flickr; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr; David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Flickr; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr; David McNew/Getty Images

A screenshot of the Bureau of Land Management's home page displays a photo of a "large coal seam at the Peabody North Antelope Rochelle Mine in Wyoming." Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR

An M-44 device — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Several petitions are now calling for the removal of these devices used to protect livestock from predators. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls M-44s "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office

A video from the Bureau of Land Management-Alaska Facebook page showed a mysterious object moving in the Chena River. The BLM called it an "Ice Monster." Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR

An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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Cliven Bundy stands along the road near his ranch after speaking with media in Bunkerville, Nev., on Jan. 27. His sons led the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, and he was arrested Wednesday on charges stemming from a 2014 standoff with federal agents. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Cliven Bundy's Arrest Caps Years Of Calls For Government To Take Action

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"Get in line" is what William Anderson, former chairman of the Moapa Band of Paiutes, says of the current take-back-federal-lands movement. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Dispute Over Cattle Grazing Disrupts Patrols Of Federal Land

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A U.S. flag hangs over a sign in front of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Tuesday near Burns, Ore. An armed group has occupied the refuge since the weekend. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Why There's No Sign Of Law Enforcement At Site Of Oregon Takeover

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People gather as Ammon Bundy speaks with reporters during a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Monday near Burns, Ore. Bundy's occupation of the federal land started on Saturday. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Oregon Occupation Sheds Light On Local Frustrations, But Divides Residents

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