bureau of land management bureau of land management

A screenshot of the Bureau of Land Management's home page displays a photo of a "large coal seam at the Peabody North Antelope Rochelle Mine in Wyoming." Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR

An M-44 device — also known as a "cyanide bomb" for the way it sprays sodium cyanide — sits nested between two rocks. Several petitions are now calling for the removal of these devices used to protect livestock from predators. Mark Mansfield, father of a boy accidentally sprayed March 16 in Idaho, calls M-44s "neither safe nor humane." Bannock County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Bannock County Sheriff's Office

A video from the Bureau of Land Management-Alaska Facebook page showed a mysterious object moving in the Chena River. The BLM called it an "Ice Monster." Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Bureau of Land Management/Screenshot by NPR

An oil field truck is used to make a transfer at oil-storage tanks in Williston, N.D., in 2014. It was atop tanks like these that oil worker Dustin Bergsing, 21, was found dead. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Mysterious Death Reveals Risk In Federal Oil Field Rules

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Cliven Bundy stands along the road near his ranch after speaking with media in Bunkerville, Nev., on Jan. 27. His sons led the occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, and he was arrested Wednesday on charges stemming from a 2014 standoff with federal agents. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Cliven Bundy's Arrest Caps Years Of Calls For Government To Take Action

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"Get in line" is what William Anderson, former chairman of the Moapa Band of Paiutes, says of the current take-back-federal-lands movement. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Dispute Over Cattle Grazing Disrupts Patrols Of Federal Land

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A U.S. flag hangs over a sign in front of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Tuesday near Burns, Ore. An armed group has occupied the refuge since the weekend. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Why There's No Sign Of Law Enforcement At Site Of Oregon Takeover

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People gather as Ammon Bundy speaks with reporters during a news conference at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge headquarters on Monday near Burns, Ore. Bundy's occupation of the federal land started on Saturday. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Oregon Occupation Sheds Light On Local Frustrations, But Divides Residents

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Protesters in Burns, Ore., march toward the home of Dwight Hammond Jr., a local rancher convicted of arson on federal land. The Jan. 2 protest was peaceful, but ended with a group of militiamen occupying the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Amelia Templeton/OPB hide caption

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Amelia Templeton/OPB

Ranchers And The Federal Government: The Long History Of Conflict

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Rancher Cliven Bundy holds his 5-month-old grandson Roper Cox on Saturday in Bunkerville, Nev. Bundy was hosting an event to mark one year since the Bureau of Land Management's failed attempt to collect his cattle. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Year After Denying Federal Control, Bundy Still Runs His Bit Of Nevada

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