Freddie Gray Freddie Gray

Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby, center, speaks during a news conference Wednesday after her office dropped remaining charges against the three Baltimore police officers who were still awaiting trial in Freddie Gray' death. Third from left, in a cap, is Freddie Gray's father, Richard Shipley. Steve Ruark/AP hide caption

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Steve Ruark/AP

People walk by a mural depicting Freddie Gray in Baltimore on June 23, at the intersection where Gray was arrested in 2015. Prosecutors in Baltimore have dropped all remaining charges against police officers related to Gray's death while in police custody. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Lt. Brian Rice (second from left) was acquitted Monday in the 2015 death of Freddie Gray. Rice is seen here arriving at the courthouse for opening statements in his trial in Baltimore on July 7. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

This photo from the Baltimore Police Department shows the six police officers charged with felonies including assault and murder in the death of Freddie Gray. Top row from left: Caesar R. Goodson Jr., Garrett E. Miller and Edward M. Nero. Bottom row from left: William G. Porter, Brian W. Rice and Alicia D. White. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, arrives at the courthouse in Baltimore ahead of Thursday's verdict. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Baltimore police Officer Caesar Goodson (right) walks past Deputy Donald Rheubottom before entering a courthouse in Baltimore in January. Goodson, one of six Baltimore police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, goes on trial starting Thursday. Bryan Woolston, Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Woolston, Pool/Getty Images

Officer Edward Nero (center) arrives at court in Baltimore on Monday. Nero has been found not guilty of multiple misdemeanor charges in the Freddie Gray case. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Baltimore Police Officer Found Not Guilty In Freddie Gray Case

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In this photo provided by the Baltimore Police Department, Officer Edward Nero poses for a mugshot on May 1, 2015, in Baltimore. He was arrested in connection with the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died after sustaining injuries while in police custody. Getty Images hide caption

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Marvin Cheatham, president of the Matthew Henson Neighborhood Association, stands in front of a row of abandoned homes in West Baltimore. He would like to see them torn down and replaced by a food market, a senior center and a health clinic — all of which the neighborhood currently lacks. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

In Baltimore, Hopes Of Turning Abandoned Properties Into Affordable Homes

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Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City health commissioner, visits a newly opened Safe Streets center in the Sandtown-Winchester neighborhood in West Baltimore. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Lesson Learned For Baltimore's Health Commissioner: 'I Like A Fight'

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A mural memorializing Freddie Gray is painted on the wall near the place where he was tackled and arrested last year by police at the Gilmor Homes housing project in Baltimore, Md. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Year After Freddie Gray's Death, Trials Set To Begin (Again)

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This photo from the Baltimore Police Department shows the six police officers charged with felonies ranging from assault to murder in the death of Freddie Gray. Top row from left: Caesar R. Goodson Jr., Garrett E. Miller and Edward M. Nero. Bottom row from left: William G. Porter, Brian W. Rice and Alicia D. White. Uncredited/AP hide caption

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Uncredited/AP

Officer William Porter's trial has ended in a mistrial. He is one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray. His case is the first to come to court. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

William Porter faces charges of manslaughter, assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office. He is one of six Baltimore police officers charged in connection with the death of Freddie Gray. Rob Carr/AP hide caption

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Rob Carr/AP

An empty jury box at the Orange County Courthouse during the Casey Anthony murder trial in 2011. Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Red Huber/Orlando Sentinel/MCT/Landov

Why Courts Use Anonymous Juries, Like In Freddie Gray Case

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William Porter, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, arrives at a courthouse for jury selection in his trial on Monday in Baltimore. Rob Carr/AP hide caption

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Rob Carr/AP

A mural for Freddie Gray is seen at the intersection of North Mount and Presbury streets where he was arrested in April. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

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Jun Tsuboike/NPR

Baltimore Residents Wary As Freddie Gray Trials Slated To Begin

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Mentor Antwon Cooper (left) helps student Julius Barne, 15, during a group activity in a history class. Jun Tsuboike/NPR hide caption

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Jun Tsuboike/NPR

For At-Risk Kids, Mentors Provide Far More Than Just Homework Help

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