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trans pacific partnership

Vice President Pence and Japanese Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Taro Aso leave the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo on Tuesday. Pence said the U.S. and Japan had launched talks that could eventually result in a bilateral trade deal between the two economies. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump delivers an economic policy speech to the Detroit Economic Club on Monday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Listen to Trump's Economic Speech

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton announced Wednesday she opposes the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal that the White House strongly supports. Jim Cole/AP hide caption

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Jim Cole/AP

Rep. Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio, and fellow Democratic members of Congress hold a news conference to voice their opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) is interviewed for TV in September 2014. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Paul Ryan: Trade Deal Will Help U.S. 'Set The Standards For The Global Economy'

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To study the draft Trans-Pacific Partnership language, senators have to go to the basement of the Capitol and enter a secured, soundproof room in this hallway and surrender their mobile devices. Ailsa Chang/NPR hide caption

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Ailsa Chang/NPR

A Trade Deal Read In Secret By Only A Few (Or Maybe None)

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A food market in Singapore in 2012. The U.S. government says that American farmers can help "fill the void" being created by rising demand for meat in countries like Singapore through the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Allie Caulfield/Flickr hide caption

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Allie Caulfield/Flickr