Sepsis Sepsis
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Sepsis

Bacteria (purple) in the bloodstream can trigger sepsis, a life-threatening illness. Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource hide caption

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Steve Gschmeissner/ScienceSource

Regulations That Mandate Sepsis Care Appear To Have Worked In New York

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Shauna Pelfrey talks to her husband, Dorian, while preparing for his dialysis appointment. Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR hide caption

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Lynsey Weatherspoon for NPR

Vitamin Treatment For Sepsis Is Put To The Test

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Randy and Karen O'Burke together at their son's home in Hendersonville, Tenn., last week. "Apparently, I'm pretty much of a miracle," Randy says. Morgan Hornsby for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Hornsby for NPR

How To Prevent Brain-Sapping Delirium In The ICU

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Without including a "control group" of sepsis patients who get the usual mix of drugs and fluids, even a big study comparing two other experimental approaches won't deliver helpful answers, critics say. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images/Getty Images

Critics Trying To Stop A Big Study Of Sepsis Say The Research Puts Patients At Risk

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Dr. Paul Marik (left) discusses patient care with medical students and resident physicians during morning rounds at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital in 2014 in Norfolk, Va. Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jay Westcott for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Can A Cocktail Of Vitamins And Steroids Cure A Major Killer In Hospitals?

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Rosemary Grant is a registered nurse and helps coordinate sepsis care at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle. The center's goal, she says, is to get a patient who might be developing sepsis antibiotics within three hours. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Synergy Between Nurses And Automation Could Be Key To Finding Sepsis Early

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Kristopher Kelly near his home in Concrete, Wash., in February. He broke his pelvis and all his ribs in a work accident last year. The resulting infection he developed in the hospital almost killed him. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

Did An IV Cocktail Of Vitamins And Drugs Save This Lumberjack From Sepsis?

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Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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A 4-year-old regulation in New York state requires doctors and hospitals to treat sepsis using a protocol that some researchers now question. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Getty Images/iStockphoto

Are State Rules For Treating Sepsis Really Saving Lives?

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A well-regarded intensive care doctor in Virginia says he has had good success in treating 150 sepsis patients with a mix of IV corticosteroids, vitamin C and vitamin B, along with careful management of fluids. Other doctors want more proof — the sort that comes only via more rigorous tests. Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Sukiyashi/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Why The Newly Proposed Sepsis Treatment Needs More Study

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Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

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Bob Skierski at the beach in Avalon, N.J., just hours before he fell ill and went to the hospital. He never went home. Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers hide caption

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Courtesy of Jennifer Rodgers

Sepsis, A Wily Killer, Stymies Doctors' Efforts To Tame It

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