peanuts peanuts
Stories About

peanuts

Comic strip Snoopy first started rocking a puffer jacket in the 1980s. A plush version of the bundled-up beagle is flying off the shelves in 2023. ©Peanuts Worldwide LLC hide caption

toggle caption
©Peanuts Worldwide LLC

Gen Z is suddenly obsessed with Snoopy — and not just because he's cute

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1219512092/1219512093" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Peanuts gang celebrates Thanksgiving, but why is Franklin by himself on one side of the table? Allstar Picture Library Limited/Alamy hide caption

toggle caption
Allstar Picture Library Limited/Alamy

'A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving' turns 50 this year. How has it held up?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1214168977/1214918103" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cartoonist Charles Schulz poses with a sketch of Snoopy in his office in Santa Rosa, Calif. Schulz, who died shortly after his retirement in 2000, would have turned 100 on Nov. 26. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Margot/AP

'Peanuts' still brings comfort and joy, 100 years after Charles Schulz's birth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1138671852/1139394916" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Franklin Armstrong made his debut in the Peanuts in 1968. Peanuts Worldwide LLC hide caption

toggle caption
Peanuts Worldwide LLC

A project named for 'Peanuts' character Franklin aims to boost Black animators

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114089182/1114183919" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Peanuts characters reminded readers of the importance of Title IX at a moment when many schools and athletic programs were resistant to it. Peanuts © 1979 Peanuts Worldwide LLC hide caption

toggle caption
Peanuts © 1979 Peanuts Worldwide LLC

'Peanuts,' one of the world's most popular cartoons, pushed for Title IX in the 1970s

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1106886757/1107691325" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some of the "milks" on offer by Elmhurst Milked, which operated as a traditional dairy in New York for nearly 100 years. These days, Elmhurst has replaced cows with nuts, oats and rice. Courtesy of Elmhurst Milked hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Elmhurst Milked

The National Institutes of Health has announced new guidelines for when parents should begin introducing peanut-containing foods into the diets of infants at risk for food allergies. Andrew M. Halpern/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew M. Halpern/Flickr

Peanuts and straight peanut butter are a choking hazard for infants, doctors say, but a bit of watered-down puree of peanut butter, starting at around 6-months-old, can help prevent peanut allergies. Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Hagiwara/Getty Images

Hey, Baby, Meet Peanuts: How And When To Safely Introduce The Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501594010/501975733" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sacks full of peanuts are displayed for sale at a market in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Aid groups say they are dismayed by a planned influx of American-grown peanuts from a U.S. agricultural surplus that they fear could undercut a vital cash crop in the impoverished Caribbean nation. Dieu Nalio Chery/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dieu Nalio Chery/AP

Mariama Keita, a farmer in Senegal, uses her cellphone to figure out the best time to harvest her peanut plants. Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

This Peanut Farmer Turns To A Cellphone — And Prayer — For A Top Crop

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456194983/458361295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Three women in Malawi hold buckets of a fortified corn soy blend. Is this the right food for pregnant teens? Or is nutrition-rich peanut butter better? Courtesy of Project Peanut Butter hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Project Peanut Butter