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Kerri De Nies plays with her son, Gregory Mac Phee at their home in San Diego. Gregory tested positive for adrenoleukodystrophy, a rare brain disorder that affects 1 in about 18,000 babies. Roughly 30 percent of boys with the genetic mutation go on to develop the most serious form of the disease. Anna Gorman/KHN hide caption

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Anna Gorman/KHN

Parents Lobby States To Expand Newborn Screening Test For Rare Brain Disorder

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Matt Twombly for NPR

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

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Lara Hogan developed preeclampsia when she was pregnant with her son Zion in 2016. Both are fine now, but she's taking extra precautions to stay healthy. Anna Gorman/California Healthline hide caption

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Anna Gorman/California Healthline

Women With High-Risk Pregnancies Are More Likely To Develop Heart Disease

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San Francisco lactation counselor Caroline Kerhervé — with kids of her clients — during a weekly session of a new mothers' group she coached in May. Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve hide caption

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Courtesy of Caroline Kerherve

Keyshla Rivera smiles at her newborn son Jesus as registered nurse Christine Weick demonstrates a baby box before her discharge from Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia in 2016. All mothers who deliver at the hospital receive a box, which functions as a bassinet, in an effort to reduce unsafe sleep practices. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

A newborn has its umbilical cord cut after birth in a Nigerian hospital. In a contest last week, MBA students came up with plans to get moms and dads to use an antiseptic on the cord stump to ward off infection. Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/USAID's flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program hide caption

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Courtesy of Karen Kasmauski/USAID's flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program

Iris and Eli Fugate with their 6-month-old son Jack, at the family's home in San Diego. Thanks to California's paid family leave law, Iris was able to take six weeks off when Jack was born, and Eli took three weeks, with plans to take the remaining time over the next few months. Sandy Huffaker for NPR hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker for NPR

How California's 'Paid Family Leave' Law Buys Time For New Parents

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A woman breast-feeds her child as she waits to donate milk to a milk bank in Lima. The donations are used for babies whose mothers can't provide breast milk. Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images

When Dr. Bina Valsangkar had a miscarriage in India, she received state-of-the-art medical care. But just a few miles from the hospital she visited, nurses were struggling to keep up with sick patients. Courtesy of Save the Children hide caption

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Courtesy of Save the Children