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primates

A chimpanzee hugs her newborn at Burgers' Zoo in Arnhem, Netherlands, in 2010. Over the course of his long career, primatologist Frans de Waal has become convinced that primates and other animals express emotions similar to human emotions. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Sex, Empathy, Jealousy: How Emotions And Behavior Of Other Primates Mirror Our Own

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Zhong Zhong (left) and Hua Hua are the first primate clones made by somatic cell nuclear transfer, the same process that created Dolly the sheep in 1996. Qiang Sun and Mu-ming Poo/Chinese Academy of Sciences/Cell Press hide caption

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Qiang Sun and Mu-ming Poo/Chinese Academy of Sciences/Cell Press

Chinese Scientists Clone Monkeys Using Method That Created Dolly The Sheep

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Patrick States slices into a venison steak at his home in Northglenn, Colo. Officials are asking hunters to have their kills tested before consuming the meat. Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Sam Brasch/Colorado Public Radio
Matt Twombly for NPR

Spillover Beasts: Which Animals Pose The Biggest Viral Risk?

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Eight different real faces were shown to a monkey. The images were then reconstructed using analyzing electrical activity from 205 neurons recorded while the monkey was viewing the faces. Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Doris Tsao/Cell Press

Cracking The Code That Lets The Brain ID Any Face, Fast

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An orangutan mother and her 11-month old infant in Borneo. Orangutans breast-feed offspring off and on for up to eight years. Tim Laman/Science Advances hide caption

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Tim Laman/Science Advances

Orangutan Moms Are The Primate Champs Of Breast-Feeding

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