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Elk graze in Skagit Valley, an area north of Seattle, Wash., populated for centuries by Native Americans and, more recently, by farmers. Megan Farmer/KUOW hide caption

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Megan Farmer/KUOW

Elk Raise Tensions Between Tribes And Farmers In Washington's Skagit Valley

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Archaeologists excavate one of the Ancestral Puebloan pit houses in the path of the planned highway in southern Colorado. Ali Budner/KRCC hide caption

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Ali Budner/KRCC

Colorado Highway Expansion Routed Over Ancient Native American Sites

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Raedeyn Teton, left, and Jessica Broncho, race side-by-side in an Indian Relay on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in Idaho. Russel Daniels/KUER hide caption

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Russel Daniels/KUER

Indian Relay Celebrates History And Culture Through Horse Racing

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Blood quantum was initially a system that the federal government placed onto tribes in an effort to limit their citizenship. Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

So What Exactly Is 'Blood Quantum'?

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For Vernon Lee of the Moapa Band of Paiutes, a national monument designation for Gold Butte would be the next best thing to having the U.S. government return the land to his people. Kirk Siegler hide caption

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Kirk Siegler

In Nevada, Tribes Push To Protect Land At The Heart Of Bundy Ranch Standoff

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We're pretty good at living and working with people who aren't our relatives. A new study tries to figure out the origins of that ability. Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Corbis hide caption

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Alberto Ruggieri/Illustration Works/Corbis