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Devin Sloane (right) arrives at federal court in Boston on Tuesday for sentencing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Sloane admitted to paying $250,000 to get his son into the University of Southern California as a fake water polo player. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

David Coleman, CEO of the College Board, which administers the SAT, announced on Tuesday that the company's "adversity score" was being abandoned and replaced by a new tool that provides information about a student's socioeconomic background. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

College Board Drops Its 'Adversity Score' For Each Student After Backlash

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Former University of Southern California soccer coach Laura Janke exiting a Boston federal court Tuesday, where she pleaded guilty to charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Actresses Lori Loughlin (left) and Felicity Huffman appeared in federal court in Boston on Wednesday along with a group of other parents. A total of 50 people have been charged in connection with the alleged years-long scam. AP hide caption

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AP

John Awiel Chol Diing, who grew up in refugee camps, is now studying agricultural science at Earth University in Costa Rica. Above: He visited Washington, D.C., last week as a 2019 Next Generation Delegate, a program run by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. "To be dedicating his life to giving back — his was a voice we had to have," says Marcus Glassman of the council. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

In the wake of the college admissions scandal that has ensnared a slew of wealthy parents, college coaches and others in the world of academia, USC has placed a hold on the accounts of students allegedly connected to the scheme. Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Allen J. Schaben/LA Times via Getty Images

A composite photo shows Lori Loughlin (left) and Felicity Huffman — two actresses charged in what the Justice Department says is a massive cheating scheme that rigged admissions to elite universities. AP hide caption

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AP

Students walk through a gate on the Harvard University campus. In a recent complaint, dozens of groups have alleged that the school's admissions process holds Asian-American applicants to an unfairly high standard. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Behind The Curtain Of College Admissions, Fairness May Not Be Priority No. 1

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