bird bird

This laser unit is one of six that repel thieving birds from the blueberry fields of Meduri Farms near Jefferson, Ore. Tom Banse/Northwest News Network hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/633065620/637932238" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An international team of scientists believes it has solved the mystery of how eggs got their shapes. Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frans Lanting/Mint Images RM/Getty Images

How Do Eggs Get Their Shapes? Scientists Think They've Cracked It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533840419/533989417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A kea parrot picks at the antenna of a vehicle in New Zealand. Ullstein Bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ullstein Bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images

This Parrot Has An 'Infectious Laugh,' Scientists Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520998044/521195957" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Susan Gallagher, chief naturalist at the Carbon County Environmental Education Center in Pennsylvania, examines the eagle that died from lead poisoning. Kevin Spotts hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Spotts

Lead Ammunition Poisons Wildlife But Too Expensive To Change, Hunters Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514290612/516203299" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Spix's macaws (L-R) Felicitas, Frieda, Paula and Paul sit on a branch in their aviary in Germany. The species has not been seen in the wild for 15 years until the recent sighting in Brazil. DPA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DPA/AFP/Getty Images

There are about 400,000 greater sage grouse left on the landscape, spread across 11 Western states, from California to North Dakota. That's a fraction of what their numbers were just a century ago. Tom Koerner/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Koerner/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Fight To Save The Sage Grouse Finds Friends In All Corners Of The West

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435491783/436525812" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

One of these things is not like the other: A 3-D printed model of a beige cowbird egg stands out from its robin's egg nest mates, though their shape and heft are similar. Ana Lopez/Courtesy of Mark Hauber hide caption

toggle caption
Ana Lopez/Courtesy of Mark Hauber

Higher-Tech Fake Eggs Offer Better Clues To Wild-Bird Behavior

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/409730987/409804767" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript