lassa fever lassa fever

The multimammate mouse can transmit Lassa virus to humans. The virus is likely spread when the rodent urinates or defecates on grain supplies. US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health hide caption

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US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

The man who died of Lassa fever flew from West Africa to New York's John F. Kennedy Airport. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New Jersey Lassa Fever Death Reveals Holes In Ebola Monitoring System

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A single Lassa fever virus particle, stained to show surface spikes — they're yellow — that help the virus infect its host cells. London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine hide caption

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London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

How Worried Should We Be About Lassa Fever?

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