racial bias racial bias

Rashon Nelson speaks as Donte Robinson looks on during an interview with the Associated Press last month in Philadelphia. Their arrests at a local Starbucks quickly became a viral video and galvanized people around the country who saw the incident as modern-day racism. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Rashon Nelson (left) and Donte Robinson say they hope their arrest at a Philadelphia Starbucks one week ago helps elicit change and doesn't happen to anyone else. A video of their arrest, viewed 11 million times, has sparked outrage and protest. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Protesters demonstrate outside a Starbucks in Philadelphia on Sunday, several days after police arrested two black men who were waiting inside the Center City coffee shop. The chain has announced it will close for an afternoon on May 29 for companywide racial-bias training. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

Shalon Irving, a public health researcher who worked for the Centers for Disease Control and and Prevention who was studying the physical toll that discrimination exacts on physical health, died just a few weeks after giving birth to her daughter, Soleil. Black women are 243% more likely than white women to die during or shortly after childbirth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR
Alyson Hurt/NPR

Poll: Most Americans Think Their Own Group Faces Discrimination

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Jemele Hill, co-host of ESPN's SC6, speaking on a panel last year. Hill has landed in hot water for calling President Trump a "white supremacist." She's got her critics and lots of supporters. D Dipasupil/Getty Images for Advertising Week New York hide caption

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D Dipasupil/Getty Images for Advertising Week New York

Tuesday's case tests the constitutionality of widespread rules that bar courts from examining evidence of racial bias in jury deliberations. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Supreme Court Hears Case On Racial Bias In Jury Deliberations

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Want To Address Teachers' Biases? First, Talk About Race

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