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Morehouse College freshmen Philip Rucker, Damon Redding and Tyree Stevenson use a programming language called Python to plot a map of weather stations in the United States. Tasnim Shamma/WABE hide caption

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Tasnim Shamma/WABE

Coding While Black: Hacking The Future Of The Tech Industry

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Software coders (from left) William Stevens, Michael Harrison and Brack Quillen work at the Bit Source office in Pikeville, Ky., in February. The year-old firm has trained laid-off coal workers to become software coders. Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Owens/Bloomberg via Getty Images

From Coal To Code: A New Path For Laid-Off Miners In Kentucky

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By clicking "Like" and commenting on Facebook posts, users signal the social network's algorithm that they care about something. That in turn helps influence what they see later. Algorithms like that happen all over the web — and the programs can reflect human biases. iStockphoto hide caption

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What Makes Algorithms Go Awry?

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