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dehydration

Just a 10 percent shift in the salt concentration of your blood would make you very sick. To keep that from happening, the body has developed a finely tuned physiological circuit that includes information about that and a beverage's saltiness, to know when to signal thirst. Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images hide caption

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Nodar Chernishev/Getty Images

Blech! Brain Science Explains Why You're Not Thirsty For Salt Water

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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Unless you replenish fluids, just an hour's hike in the heat or a 30-minute run might be enough to get mildly dehydrated, scientists say. RunPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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RunPhoto/Getty Images

Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated

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Kids and teens should get two to three quarts of water per day, via food or drink, research suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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Got Water? Most Kids, Teens Don't Drink Enough

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