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overfishing

Swordfish like this one, sunning itself off the coast of Ventura, Calif. have traditionally been caught in drift gillnets. But ocean activists say the method is unsustainable because it captures too many other sea creatures. Douglas Klug/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Klug/Getty Images

Fish market workers in Jersey City, N.J., prepare a bluefin tuna for shipment to some of New York's top sushi restaurants. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Deckhand Patrick Gallager tosses the day's catch to the dock from the Fairwater Two charter boat. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Who Gets To Fish For Red Snapper In The Gulf? It's All Politics

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A fisherman in the Gulf of Mexico. Catch share programs allot fishermen a portion of the catch in advance, in hopes of keeping them from racing each other to sea, sometimes in risky weather. These programs are controversial. They also work, a new study finds. Courtesy of John Rae hide caption

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Courtesy of John Rae

Portland's Gulf of Maine Research Institute has designed a trawl net that aims to target species that can still be profitable while avoiding cod. Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Gulf of Maine Research Institute

A fishing dragger hauls in a net full of Atlantic cod, yellowtail flounder and American lobster off the coast of New England. Greenpeace says Ray Hilborn, a prominent fisheries scientist known for challenging studies that show declines in fish populations, failed to fully disclose industry funding on some of his scientific papers. Jeff Rotman/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Rotman/Getty Images

Peruvian anchoveta being processed at a fish meal factory in Lima in 2009. The small forage species has been heavily fished. Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides/AFP/Getty Images

Chris Tremblay, a member of the Passive Acoustics group at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center, deploys an underwater recording device along the Eastern Seaboard to listen for the mating sounds of Atlantic cod. Courtesy of Chris Tremblay hide caption

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Courtesy of Chris Tremblay

Scientists, Fishing Fleet Team Up To Save Cod — By Listening

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