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A menstrual cup — this one is made of silicone rubber — is designed to collect menstrual blood. The bell-shaped device is folded and inserted into the vagina. The tip helps with removal. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Sarah Groustra, a Brookline High School graduate, wrote a column in the school newspaper about period stigma last year. It led to Brookline officials voting to offer free pads and tampons in all town-owned restrooms. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Student Spurs Brookline, Mass., To Offer Free Tampons And Pads In Public Buildings

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Manisha Jaisi, 16, poses at the shed outside her house where she sleeps when she has her period. Jaisi got her period two months after her neighbor, Dambara Upadhyay, died of unknown causes while sleeping in a similar shed in 2016. Jaisi says she never goes without her phone in the shed because she's scared after Upadhyay's death. Sajana Shrestha for NPR hide caption

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Sajana Shrestha for NPR

Why It's Hard To Ban The Menstrual Shed

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Producer Melissa Berton (center) and director Rayka Zehtabchi (right) accept an Oscar for their documentary 'Period. End of Sentence.' Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images

The Arizona Department of Corrections said it would give inmates three times the amount of free sanitary napkins, following a backlash to restrictions. Inmates are still required to purchase tampons. BSIP/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

This is an example of a hut where a woman in Nepal who is menstruating will spend the night. The photo was taken in Achham district, in the western part of the country, where the practice occurs even though it has been banned by the government. Poulomi Basu/Magnum Emergency Fund hide caption

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Poulomi Basu/Magnum Emergency Fund

A school scene in Uganda. David Turnley/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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David Turnley/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

Does Handing Out Sanitary Pads Really Get Girls To Stay In School?

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Clockwise from upper left: Dr. Forster Amponsah; a Malick Sidbe photo taken in Mali; a global garden of radio; Chewa the TB-sniffing rat; another Sidbe photo; Olympic medalist Fu Yuanhui of China; the New Mexico cave where a superhero bacterium lived; poverty fighter Sir Fazle Hasan Abed; calligrapher Sughra Hussainy; activist Loyce Maturu. Jason Beaubien/NPR, Courtesy of Malick Sidibe and Jack Shainman Gallery, Katherine Streeter for NPR, Maarten Boersema/APOPO, Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images, Courtesy of Max Wisshak, Courtesy of BRAC, Ben de la Cruz and Toya Sarno Jordan/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR, Courtesy of Malick Sidibe and Jack Shainman Gallery, Katherine Streeter for NPR, Maarten Boersema/APOPO, Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images, Courtesy of Max Wisshak, Courtesy of BRAC, Ben de la Cruz and Toya Sarno Jordan/NPR