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It's one thing to track your heart rate, pulse or other movements with a smart watch or other consumer electronics, researchers say, but quite another to rely on the device to diagnose a disease. martin-dm/Getty Images hide caption

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Like It Or Not, Personal Health Technology Is Getting Smarter

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Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine

Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

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The Text4Baby app sends free, periodic text messages in Spanish or English to pregnant women and new moms about prenatal care, labor and delivery, breastfeeding, developmental milestones and immunizations. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

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A Fitbit Saved His Life? Well, Maybe

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In the current version of the Fitnet App, the camera of an exerciser's smartphone captures data from him (upper left), while a prerecorded trainer guides him through a workout. A clock (bottom center) shows elapsed time. The orange dots (upper left) indicate he's following her routine well, as judged by the camera and phone's app. The app can also estimate the exerciser's number of steps. Courtesy of FitNet hide caption

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Courtesy of FitNet

Fitbit stock begins trading publicly Thursday. The Fitbit Force is shown at the 2014 International CES, the consumer technology trade show, in Las Vegas. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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As Fitbit Goes Public, It Will Have To Outrun Competition

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