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Lawmakers across the U.S. want to crack down on bots and ticket resellers

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Kansas City Chiefs' tight end #87 Travis Kelce and Kansas City Chiefs' quarterback #15 Patrick Mahomes hug after winning Super Bowl LVIII against the San Francisco 49ers at Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas, Nevada, February 11, 2024. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Taylor Swift hugs Kansas City Chiefs player Travis Kelce after a game last month against the Baltimore Ravens as she wears a diamond bracelet designed by Wove, a company founded by two former U.S. Army Rangers. Rob Carr/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Carr/Getty Images

Vets' jewelry company feels the 'Swift effect' after the singer wore diamond bracelet

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A Swiftie Super Bowl, a stumbling bank, and other indicators

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Fans hold up signs during the NFL game between Miami Dolphins and Kansas City Chiefs in Germany in November. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

Travis Kelce and Taylor Swift celebrate after the Kansas City Chiefs defeated the Baltimore Ravens in the AFC Championship Game at M&T Bank Stadium in Maryland on Sunday. Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Kelsey, Kristen and Kaylen Kassab of The K3 Sisters Band in front of the Barbie Theater at World of Barbie at Stonebriar Centre Mall on in Frisco, Texas. Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images for World of Barbie hide caption

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Richard Rodriguez/Getty Images for World of Barbie

Taylor Swift watched the Kansas City Chiefs play at Arrowhead Stadium on Sunday. At one point she ate a snack and unknowingly set a meme in motion. David Eulitt/Getty Images hide caption

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David Eulitt/Getty Images
Kevin Winter/Getty Images for TAS Rights Mana

Economics, boosternomics and Swiftnomics

For this week's Indicators of the Week, Darian is joined by NPR colleagues Jeff Guo and Sydney Lupkin. We get into the latest numbers on child poverty in the U.S. and what it tells us about effective policy intervention. Sydney brings an update on the new covid booster and who's paying for it. And Jeff talks about Taylor Swift...again. He promises it has to do with economics.

Economics, boosternomics and Swiftnomics

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Left photo: Brazil's President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva. Right photo: Taylor Alison Swift. Left: Evaristo Sa (AFP), Right: Amy Sussman (Getty) hide caption

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Left: Evaristo Sa (AFP), Right: Amy Sussman (Getty)

Dollar v. world / Taylor Swift v. FTX / Fox v. Dominion

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Penny Harrison and her son Parker Harrison rally outside the U.S. Capitol during the Senate Judiciary Committee's Ticketmaster hearing on Tuesday morning. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate's Ticketmaster hearing featured plenty of Taylor Swift puns and protesters

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Ticket scalpers and the Taylor Swift fiasco (Encore)

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The article in question argues that by not tacitly embracing progressive politics, Taylor Swift "could well be construed as her lending support to the voices rising against embracing diversity and inclusion emblematic of Trump supporters." John Shearer/Getty Images for DirecTV hide caption

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John Shearer/Getty Images for DirecTV

Taylor Swift on Nov. 21, 2013, just a few months after the Denver meet-and-greet that resulted in lawsuits. Former radio host David Mueller sued Swift, claiming she had gotten him fired. Swift countersued for sexual assault. John Sciulli/Getty Images hide caption

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John Sciulli/Getty Images