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deafness

Rima Prajapati with daughters (from left) Jhoti, Aarti and Sangeeta. Jhoti and Aarti were both born deaf. Rima moved her daughters from their village to Mumbai so they could attend a school for the deaf. Kate Petcosky-Kulkarni for NPR hide caption

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Kate Petcosky-Kulkarni for NPR

Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevent A Form Of Deafness In Mice

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Todd Haynes On 'Wonderstruck,' And Evolution Of Deaf Culture In The U.S.

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David Uzzell at work in the kitchen at Marcel's. Uzzell has a written list of daily tasks from chef and owner Robert Wiedmaier at his station, and his ever-present notepad and pencil on the shelf above serves as communication tools for more specific instructions. Kristen Hartke for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Hartke for NPR

SignAloud gloves translate sign language into text and speech. Conrado Tapado/Univ of Washington, CoMotion hide caption

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Conrado Tapado/Univ of Washington, CoMotion

These Gloves Offer A Modern Twist On Sign Language

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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Public Health Image Library/CDC

Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Corbis

Genetic Tweaks Are Restoring Hearing In Animals, Raising Hopes For People

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