voter fraud voter fraud

A sign appears outside the room where the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, July 19, 2017. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner (from right), Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach and former Ohio Secretary of State Ken Blackwell at the second meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, on Tuesday. Holly Ramer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Holly Ramer/AP

Tension And Protests Mark Trump Voting Commission Meeting

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/550518986/550607454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kansas Secretary of State, Kris Kobach, left, and Vice President Pence at the first meeting of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, in July. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach talks with a reporter in his office in Topeka, Kan., in May of this year, after he was appointed by President Trump to co-chair the Presidential Commission on Election Integrity. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Orlin Wagner/AP

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach speaking to supporters last month upon launching his campaign for the Republican nomination for governor. He also vice-chairs the president's election integrity commission. John Hanna/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Hanna/AP

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, seen earlier this month, says he is among the state officials who isn't able to provide all the voter identification details the national commission he vice-chairs is seeking. John Hanna/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Hanna/AP

A polling station in Virginia during the state's primary election in March 2016. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

Despite Little Evidence Of Fraud, White House Launches Voting Commission

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/527924633/527990636" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump called for a major investigation into voter fraud on Wednesday. This comes after widespread criticism of his unverified claim that up to 5 million people voted illegally. Ringo Chiu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ringo Chiu/AFP/Getty Images

Despite Criticism Of Claims, Trump Seeks Investigation Into Voter Fraud

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511655860/511655861" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump hosts Democratic and Republican congressional leaders in the State Dining Room of the White House on Monday. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Election officials test ballot tabulation machines in Phoenix. Carrie Jung/KJZZ hide caption

toggle caption
Carrie Jung/KJZZ

As Calls Of A 'Rigged' Election Continue, Voting Officials Highlight Open Doors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/500369238/500380860" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Rigging An Election? It's Not So Easy, Voting Law Expert Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499274789/499321587" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Danaher ELECTronic 1242 voting machine, on display in 2004 at the Franklin County Board of Elections office in Columbus, Ohio. The machines have been in use in the state since 1992. David S. Holloway/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David S. Holloway/Getty Images

Why Worries About Paperless Voting Loom Larger This Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498255215/498442068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A poll worker organizes "I Voted Today" stickers at the Francis Myers Recreation Center polling location in Philadelphia, Pa., on April 26. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Can Pro-Trump Poll Watchers Disrupt Voting In Pennsylvania?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497195812/497256747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Donald Trump gives his acceptance speech during the final day of the Republican National Convention, July 21, in Cleveland. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark J. Terrill/AP

Hear A Related Story From Don Gonyea On The Campaign Trail

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488893858/489002933" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mary Helen Flores (center) is the founder of Citizens Against Voter Abuse. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

In Rio Grande Valley, Some Campaign Workers Are Paid To Harvest Votes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/413463879/420769529" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript