Health technology Health technology
Stories About

Health technology

A Harvard research team's prototype of a portable exosuit is made of cloth components worn at the waist and thighs. A computer that's built into the shorts uses an algorithm that can sense when the user shifts between a walking gait and a running gait. Wyss Institute at Harvard University hide caption

toggle caption
Wyss Institute at Harvard University

These Experimental Shorts Are An 'Exosuit' That Boosts Endurance On The Trail

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/751096093/751561831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jessica Holloway-Haytcher uses an app that helps her track meals, exercise and keep in touch with an online coach. Mark Rogers Photography hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Rogers Photography

My New Diet Is An App: Weight Loss Goes Digital

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/712809955/713616965" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers had participants wear the fitness trackers while walking or running on a treadmill and while riding an exercise bike to determine how well the trackers measured heart rate and energy expenditure. Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Sakuma/Courtesy of Stanford University School of Medicine

Fitness Trackers: Good at Measuring Heart Rate, Not So Good At Measuring Calories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529839681/529893155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Text4Baby app sends free, periodic text messages in Spanish or English to pregnant women and new moms about prenatal care, labor and delivery, breastfeeding, developmental milestones and immunizations. Kristin Adair/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kristin Adair/NPR

Dartmouth College researcher Timothy Pierson holds a prototype of Wanda, which is designed to establish secure wireless connections between devices that generate data. Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College hide caption

toggle caption
Eli Burakian/Dartmouth College

Amanda Angelotti (left) and Connie Chen, both graduates of University of California, San Francisco's medical school, opted for careers in digital health. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Josh Cassidy/KQED

Arturo Martinez watches his wife, Aurora Martinez, put on makeup in their San Rafael, Calif., home. She has Alzheimer's. Lynne Shallcross for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lynne Shallcross for NPR

Can Technology Ease The Burden Of Caring For People With Dementia?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/417205451/418490470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript