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The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

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As scientists learn more about the complex way genes combine and work together to create human traits, the idea of "designer babies" becomes less and less likely. BlackJack3D/Getty Images hide caption

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BlackJack3D/Getty Images

Why Making A 'Designer Baby' Would Be Easier Said Than Done

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Dieter Egli, a developmental biologist at Columbia University, and Katherine Palmerola examine a newly fertilized egg injected with a CRISPR editing tool. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos

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There has been a backlash since Chinese scientist He Jiankui's claim that he edited genes in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies

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After a cryogenic tank like the one in this file photo lost a great deal of liquid nitrogen, a fertility clinic began the process of determining the damage to stored embryos and eggs. Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lluis Gene/AFP/Getty Images

Kathy Niakan, a developmental biologist at the Francis Crick Institute in London, used the CRISPR gene editing technique to find out how a gene affects the growth of human embryos. Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of The Francis Crick Institute

Editing Embryo DNA Yields Clues About Early Human Development

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Embryoids like this one are created from stem cells and resemble very primitive human embryos. Scientists are studying them in hopes of learning more about basic human biology and development. Courtesy of Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockefeller University

A human embryo kept alive in the lab for 12 days begins to show signs of early development. The green cells seen here in the center would go on to form the body. This embryo is in the process of twinning, forming two small spheres out of one. Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Gist Croft, Cecilia Pellegrini, Ali Brivanlou/Rockefeller University

Embryo Experiments Reveal Earliest Human Development, But Stir Ethical Debate

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Editing human genes that would be passed on for generations could make sense if the diseases are serious and the right safeguards are in places, a scientific panel says. Claude Edelmann/Science Source hide caption

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Claude Edelmann/Science Source

Scientific Panel Says Editing Heritable Human Genes Could Be OK In The Future

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Scientists have the ability to use DNA from three adults to make one embryo. But should they? A. Dudzinski/Science Source hide caption

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A. Dudzinski/Science Source

Babies With Genes From 3 People Could Be Ethical, Panel Says

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