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Democratic Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York (left) has pledged to pay her interns $15 an hour. She is seen here with Democratic Rep.-elect Deb Haaland of New Mexico. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images

Demonstrators including French trade union leader Philippe Martinez, center, protest against President Emmanuel Macron's fast-tracked labor law reforms on Sept. 12 in Paris. Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images

Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., makes opening statements during a hearing to examine the National Labor Relations Board's joint employer decision last month. Al Drago/CQ Roll Call/Getty hide caption

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Al Drago/CQ Roll Call/Getty

One Step Closer To Collective Bargaining, Some Temp Workers Unionize

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2-4-6-8, A 401(k) Would Be Great: Calif. Law Makes Cheerleaders Employees

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New federal rules could expand the number of employees eligible for overtime. That may lead more companies to curtail the use of work email after hours. Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Skopein/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Amid New Overtime Rules, More Employers Might Set Email Curfew

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