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Johnny Depp testifies during his defamation trial in the Fairfax County Circuit Courthouse in Fairfax, Va., on Tuesday. Amber Heard watches the jury leave as a lunch break starts at the Fairfax County Circuit Court on Monday. Jim Watson and Steve Helber/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson and Steve Helber/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Ms. A.B. had been allowed to stay in the U.S. for years while her case is pending. She requested that NPR identify her only by her initials because she is afraid her ex-husband might find her. Kevin D. Liles for NPR hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles for NPR

Domestic Abuse Survivors Fear Deportation Under Trump Policy Biden Has Yet To Reverse

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The pandemic and its economic fallout have made it harder for those who experience domestic violence to escape their abuser, say crisis teams, but the National Domestic Violence Hotline is one place to get quick help. Text LOVEIS to 1-866-331-9474 if speaking by phone feels too risky. Roos Koole/Getty Images hide caption

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Roos Koole/Getty Images

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

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French secretary of state for equality between men and women, Marlène Schiappa, in Paris in 2017. Philippe Lopez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP via Getty Images
Hokyoung Kim for NPR and KHN

When Teens Abuse Parents, Shame and Secrecy Make It Hard to Seek Help

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A new book explores the psychological harms of domestic violence. Nanette Hoogslag/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Nanette Hoogslag/Getty Images/Ikon Images

'No Visible Bruises' Upends Stereotypes Of Abuse, Sheds Light On Domestic Violence

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Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

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Federica Valabrega

Then-New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman speaks at a news conference on Jan. 30. Schneiderman resigned after multiple women accused him of physical abuse; a prosecutor announced Thursday that Schneiderman will not be facing criminal charges in connection with the case. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A woman sells betel nut and hand-rolled cigarettes on the street in Goroka. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

For Women In Papua New Guinea, Income From Selling Betel Nut Can Come At Heavy Price

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions spoke about his plan to limit the reasons for people to claim asylum in the U.S., at a Justice Department immigration review training program on Monday in Tysons, Va. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Attorney General Denies Asylum To Victims Of Domestic Abuse, Gang Violence

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Angela Kaupa, 54, looks out the doorway of the building in the Eastern Highlands where she shelters victims of domestic abuse. Up to 10 people can sleep on the thin mattresses and blankets that line the floor. A few personal objects are placed along the walls. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders with then-staff secretary Rob Porter in August. In the wake of Porter's resignation, Sanders has reassured reporters that President Trump is sympathetic to victims of domestic abuse. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Ousted White House staff secretary Rob Porter speaks to President Trump after remarks he made on violence in Charlottesville, Va., in August 2017 at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminister, N.J. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

From left: Malebogo Molefhe, who uses a wheelchair because she was shot by her boyfriend, is a winner of the U.S. State Department's 2017 International Women of Courage award. Dr. Eqbal Dauqan, shown in a lab at University Kebangsaan Malaysia, won a scholarship for refugees. Mira Rai of Nepal, one of the world's top ultrarunners, was named Adventurer of the Year by National Geographic. From left: Ryan Eskalis/NPR; Sanjit Das/for NPR; and Richard Bull. hide caption

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From left: Ryan Eskalis/NPR; Sanjit Das/for NPR; and Richard Bull.

One of the few women's shelters serving Moscow sits on the edge of a monastery an hour's drive from the city center. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

Rights Advocates Warn Russian Domestic Abuse Law Will 'Protect The Oppressor'

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Lakisha Briggs, at her house in Norristown, Pa. Briggs, who was being abused by her boyfriend, lodged a legal challenge against her eviction for having the police called too many times to her former residence. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

For Low-Income Victims, Nuisance Laws Force Ultimatum: Silence Or Eviction

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Stacy Bannerman testifies before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Military Quality of Life and Veterans Affairs in 2006. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

After Combat Stress, Violence Can Show Up At Home

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