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cocaine

José Palacios, a cacao farmer, holds the Late Chocó chocolate products produced by his son, Joel, in Bogotá. The package bears an illustration of his likeness. José Palacios lives in Colombia's western Chocó department, which is also a coca-growing region. Verónica Zaragovia for NPR hide caption

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Verónica Zaragovia for NPR

A farmer picks coca leaves in a field in Colombia. Joaquin Sarmiento/Getty Images hide caption

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Joaquin Sarmiento/Getty Images

Colombia Tries To Get Farmers Away From The Cocaine Biz. How's That Going?

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A farmer shows cocaine base paste, made from coca leaves in Colombia's Guaviare department in 2017. Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Arboleda/AFP/Getty Images

Colombia Is Growing Record Amounts Of Coca, The Key Ingredient In Cocaine

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The Texas Department of Criminal Justice says it found packages of cocaine with a street value of nearly $18 million inside a shipment of bananas. Russ Widstrand/Getty Images hide caption

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Russ Widstrand/Getty Images

Sombra, a drug-sniffing dog who works with Colombia's police, was relocated after a criminal organization put a price on her head. Twitter/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Twitter/Screenshot by NPR

Arlington, Mass., Police Chief Fred Ryan (right) and Inspector Gina Bassett review toxicology reports on cocaine evidence looking for the possibility of fentanyl. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine Becoming A Deadly Problem Among Drug Users

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A user prepares drugs for injection in 2014 in St. Johnsbury, Vt. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Heroin Use Surges, Especially Among Women And Whites

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