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Dr. Homer Venters, the former head of New York City's correctional health services, says that inmates held in solitary confinement cells, such as the Rikers Island cell shown above, have a higher risk of committing self-harm. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Former Physician At Rikers Island Exposes Health Risks Of Incarceration

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New York City officials on Thursday announced a $3.3 million settlement with the family of Kalief Browder, who died by suicide after spending nearly three years in Rikers Island, most of it in solitary confinement. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

People walk by a sign at the entrance to Rikers Island on March 31, 2017. New York cITY Mayor Bill de Blasio has said that he agrees with the fundamentals of a plan to close the jail complex within 10 years. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A confederacy of prison reform activists rallied at City Hall in New York City to demand that it close the long-controversial Rikers Island Corrections facility where, among others, Kalief Browder, died; critics maintain that the prison is unsafe and prolonged detention of inmates at the facility is a violation of Constitutional due process rights. Albin Lohr-Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Albin Lohr-Jones/Getty Images

Savannah Phelan, 8, and her mom, Kellie, in front of a 77-foot mural they helped paint, which reflects the experiences of children and teenagers affected by incarceration. Emily Martinez for StoryCorps hide caption

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Emily Martinez for StoryCorps

Born In Custody, A Girl Finds Answers With Someone Who Knows Best: Mom

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Three Rikers corrections officers — Alfred Rivera (left), Tobias Parker (center) and Jeffrey Richard (second from right) — arrive at court in March. Rivera and Parker were among the five officers convicted, while Richard was found not guilty. Kena Betancur /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur /AFP/Getty Images

Jamal Faison (right) with his uncle, Born Blackwell, at StoryCorps in New York City. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Navigating Life, And Relationships, After A Jail Sentence

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