wildfire wildfire
Stories About

wildfire

Vehicles pass each other on a flooded street in Chico, Calif. Flash flooding hit a wildfire-scarred area of Northern California on Thursday, forcing officials to deploy swift water rescue teams to save people stuck in vehicles and rescue them from homes after a downpour near the Paradise area. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A home burns as the Camp Fire moves through the area on Thursday in Paradise, Calif. Fueled by high winds and low humidity, the rapidly spreading Camp Fire has ripped through the town of Paradise. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A house being rebuilt in Sonoma County where the Tubbs fire burned last year. The Tubbs fire was the most destructive fire in California history, destroying more than 5,000 structures. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

toggle caption
Lauren Sommer/KQED

Getting Back What You Lost — Rebuilding In A Wildfire Zone

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/656532029/657724984" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When wildfire smoke choked their community last summer, Amy Cilimburg (left), the director of Climate Smart Missoula, helped Joy and Don Dunagan, of Seeley Lake, Mont., get a HEPA air filter through a partnership with the Missoula City-County Health Department. Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

When Wildfire Smoke Invades, Who Should Pay To Clean Indoor Air?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/585105923/588643040" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wildfire smoke filled the sky in Seeley Lake, Mont. on Aug. 7, 2017. Weather effects concentrated the accumulating smoke, chronically exposing residents to harmful substances in the air. InciWeb hide caption

toggle caption
InciWeb

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/583950017/588500167" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The wind direction from the fire in western Greenland has largely blown smoke toward the island's ice sheet and away from communities. Pierre Markuse/Flicker hide caption

toggle caption
Pierre Markuse/Flicker

Greenland Is Still Burning, But The Smoke May Be The Real Problem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/543406558/544259851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More than 10 wildfires burned over 200,000 acres in Southern California in October 2003, many of them started by humans. This satellite image shows strong winds carrying smoke over the Pacific. MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
MODIS Rapid Response Team/NASA

What's The Leading Cause Of Wildfires In The U.S.? Humans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517100594/517563267" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The remains of a business in Gatlinburg, Tenn., smolder on Nov. 29, after a devastating wildfire damaged or destroyed more than 2,000 buildings and killed at least 14 people. Brian Blanco/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Blanco/Getty Images

In January of this year, Daniel Laine surveys the site where his grandmother's Anderson Springs house had burned down in a wildfire last September. Officials said today the Valley Fire, which killed four people and wiped out more than 1,300 homes, probably started with faulty hot tub wiring. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Chiu/AP

The UNL NIMBUS Lab drone team hopes their technology will help ensure safer prescribed burns by keeping firefighters out of dangerous terrain. Ariana Brocious/NET News hide caption

toggle caption
Ariana Brocious/NET News

Drones That Launch Flaming Balls Are Being Tested To Help Fight Wildfires

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/488477317/488477318" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 2016, Mesa Verde National Park officials closed Spruce Tree House because of crumbling rock. Previous restoration efforts and more extreme temperature swings, which may be connected to climate change, are two reasons why the staff here thinks rock is crumbling. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

To Preserve History, A National Park Preps For Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/486792360/487446762" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

John Belles' concrete dome house outside Omak, Wash., has survived the wildfires unscathed amid acres of blackened hillside. The fires have caused air quality in the area to be deemed hazardous by the Washington State Department of Ecology. Tom Banse/Northwest News Network hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Banse/Northwest News Network

Homeowners In Washington Wildfire Country Try To Reduce Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/434821436/434821437" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Western firefighters will be getting help from the U.S. Army for the first time in nine years. Which fire the soldiers will fight has not been announced. In this photo, Sonoma Valley Firefighters put out a hot spot from the Rocky Fire near Clearlake, Calif., earlier this month. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Chiu/AP

A firefighter monitors flames from the Rocky Fire as it approaches a home late last month. The wildfire has consumed thousands of acres in just over a week. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Veteran Firefighter: Rocky Fire Has 'Most Extreme Fire Behavior I've Ever Seen'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/430651396/430763882" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript