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Manure lagoons on hog farms like this one in eastern North Carolina flooded after Hurricane Floyd swept through in 1999, creating environmental and health concerns for nearby rivers. Farmers are worried that the scenario will repeat after Hurricane Florence hits this week. John Althouse/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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John Althouse/AFP/Getty Images

Hog Farmers Scramble to Drain Waste Pools Ahead Of Hurricane Florence

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In Iraq, masgouf is part of the national cuisine, but it's getting harder to find as the country still reels from war, sanctions, water quality and economic problems. Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images

Rodney Stotts walks across the roof of the Matthew Henson Earth Conservation Center with one of his hawks. A former drug dealer, he is now a falconer — one of only 30 African-American falconers in the U.S., he says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Washington, D.C., A Program In Which Birds And People Lift Each Other Up

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The levees below the Oroville Dam were damaged by heavy floodwaters this winter and many need repairs. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Where Levees Fail In California, Nature Can Step In To Nurture Rivers

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Beverly Kurtz and Tim Guenthner live near Gross Reservoir outside Boulder, Colo. They oppose a an expansion project that would raise the reservoir's dam by 131 feet. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

High Demand, Low Supply: Colorado River Water Crisis Hits Across The West

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The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Health advise against eating any fish from the Lower Passaic because it may be contaminated with toxic chemicals. But Owaldo Avad says he's been catching and consuming fish like these from the river for eight years. Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/WNYC

New Jersey River Polluters Fund Toxic Fish Swap — But There's A Snag

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Fibers from the fique plant, dyed with natural pigments by artist Susana Mejia, are part of the Waterweavers exhibit. In the photo above, the fibers hang to dry in the Amazon jungle. Jorge Montoya hide caption

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Jorge Montoya